PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What is a delusional disorder?

ANSWER

Delusional disorder is a serious mental illness. It's when you have a false belief that no amount of facts and reason can shake. People with delusions cannot tell which beliefs are real and which are imaginary.

SOURCES:

Alzheimer Society Canada: “Delusions and hallucinations.”

American Journal of Psychiatry: “Cognitive neuropsychiatric models of persecutory delusions.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Delusional Disorder.”

Harvard Medical School: “Schizophrenia and epilepsy.”

Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine: “Obsessive compulsive disorder masquerading as psychosis.”

International Archives of Medicine: “Psychotic symptoms in social anxiety disorder patients: report of three cases.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Geriatric Workforce Enhancement Program: Dementia and Delirium.”

Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry: “Cognitive behavioural treatment of insomnia in individuals with persistent persecutory delusions: a pilot trial.”

Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease: “Developing treatments of persistent persecutory delusions: the impact of an emotional processing and metacognitive awareness intervention.”

Medscape: “Delirium Clinical Presentation.”

Psychological Medicine: “What makes one person paranoid and another person anxious? The differential prediction of social anxiety and persecutory ideation in an experimental situation.”

Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology: “Advances in understanding and treating persecutory delusions: a review.”

UpToDate: “Delusional disorder.”

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration: “Impact of the DSM-IV to DSM-5 Changes on the National Survey on Drug Use and Health,” “Civil Commitment and the Mental Health Care Continuum: Historical Trends and Principles for Law and Practice.”

Harvard Health Publishing: “Delusional Disorder.”

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on November 20, 2019

SOURCES:

Alzheimer Society Canada: “Delusions and hallucinations.”

American Journal of Psychiatry: “Cognitive neuropsychiatric models of persecutory delusions.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Delusional Disorder.”

Harvard Medical School: “Schizophrenia and epilepsy.”

Indian Journal of Psychological Medicine: “Obsessive compulsive disorder masquerading as psychosis.”

International Archives of Medicine: “Psychotic symptoms in social anxiety disorder patients: report of three cases.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Geriatric Workforce Enhancement Program: Dementia and Delirium.”

Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry: “Cognitive behavioural treatment of insomnia in individuals with persistent persecutory delusions: a pilot trial.”

Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease: “Developing treatments of persistent persecutory delusions: the impact of an emotional processing and metacognitive awareness intervention.”

Medscape: “Delirium Clinical Presentation.”

Psychological Medicine: “What makes one person paranoid and another person anxious? The differential prediction of social anxiety and persecutory ideation in an experimental situation.”

Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology: “Advances in understanding and treating persecutory delusions: a review.”

UpToDate: “Delusional disorder.”

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration: “Impact of the DSM-IV to DSM-5 Changes on the National Survey on Drug Use and Health,” “Civil Commitment and the Mental Health Care Continuum: Historical Trends and Principles for Law and Practice.”

Harvard Health Publishing: “Delusional Disorder.”

Reviewed by Smitha Bhandari on November 20, 2019

NEXT QUESTION:

What are delusions of persecution?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

"ALEXA, ASK WEBMD"

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.