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What is paranoid schizophrenia?

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Paranoid schizophrenia, or schizophrenia with paranoia as doctors now call it, is the most common example of this mental illness.

Schizophrenia is a kind of psychosis, which means your mind doesn't agree with reality. It affects how you think and behave. This can show up in different ways and at different times, even in the same person. The illness usually starts in late adolescence or young adulthood.

People with paranoid delusions are unreasonably suspicious of others. This can make it hard for them to hold a job, run errands, have friendships, and even go to the doctor.

Although it's a lifelong illness, you can take medicines and find help to stop symptoms or make them easier to live with.

From: What Is Paranoid Schizophrenia? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Psychiatric Association: "Schizophrenia."

National Institute of Mental Health: "What Is Schizophrenia?"

King's College Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience: "Paranoia."

Coid, J. , May 2013. JAMA Psychiatry

Freeman, D. , July 2015. Schizophrenia Bulletin

National Alliance on Mental Illness: "Psychosis."

Medscape: "Schizophrenia Treatment & Management."

Reviewed by Joseph Goldberg on October 13, 2017

SOURCES:

American Psychiatric Association: "Schizophrenia."

National Institute of Mental Health: "What Is Schizophrenia?"

King's College Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience: "Paranoia."

Coid, J. , May 2013. JAMA Psychiatry

Freeman, D. , July 2015. Schizophrenia Bulletin

National Alliance on Mental Illness: "Psychosis."

Medscape: "Schizophrenia Treatment & Management."

Reviewed by Joseph Goldberg on October 13, 2017

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What are the symptoms of paranoid schizophrenia?

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