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  • Question 1/8

    Women are often better than men at:

  • Answer 1/8

    Women are often better than men at:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Women find the right words faster and use a wider variety of words. This doesn’t mean men aren’t good speakers -- just that women seem to have a small advantage.

  • Answer 1/8

    Men tend to be better than women at:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    It’s part of what’s called “spatial awareness.” It includes how well you can gauge the size, distance, and speed of things around you -- your teammates on a basketball court, for example.

  • Question 1/8

    Generally, women are safer drivers than men.

  • Answer 1/8

    Generally, women are safer drivers than men.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Men tend to take more risks. They’re more likely to speed, drive drunk, and go without a seatbelt. They also have more severe crashes than women drivers.

  • Question 1/8

    The brains of men and women are the same.

  • Answer 1/8

    The brains of men and women are the same.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    While they’re a lot alike, there are important differences in structure and chemistry. For example, the part of the brain that triggers the fight-or-flight response -- the amygdala -- is bigger in men. So they respond a bit faster when they think there's a threat. The brain cells of men and women also connect in different ways.

  • Question 1/8

    Differences between men and women are caused by:

  • Answer 1/8

    Differences between men and women are caused by:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    They’re linked. Genes cause men to release more testosterone than women, for example, which triggers genetic traits like larger muscles, aggression, and deeper voices. Genes make women produce more estrogen, which affects many things, including learning, mood, and brain development. The X-factor: The way family and society define the roles of men and women also affects behavior.

  • Answer 1/8

    The hormone oxytocin can lead to:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Both sexes release oxytocin when they have a baby together, but it doesn’t affect them the same way. Women are driven to nurture and bond, and men to protect and defend. Men and women process lots of things differently, including other hormones and medication. Scientists aren’t sure why this happens.

  • Question 1/8

    Men get Parkinson’s disease more often than women.

  • Answer 1/8

    Men get Parkinson’s disease more often than women.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    They’re 60% more likely to get the disease, which destroys the nerve cells in your brain that control how you move. And it affects men and women in different ways. For example, the severe stiffness Parkinson’s causes may be worse in men, and women’s symptoms take longer to show up.

  • Question 1/8

    Who’s more likely to get Alzheimer’s disease?

  • Answer 1/8

    Who’s more likely to get Alzheimer’s disease?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    This disease also typically gets worse faster in women. Ironically, this may be linked to estrogen, which may help protect the brain. Before menopause, women have more of it, but after menopause, they lose that edge. Men can make estrogen from testosterone.

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    You correctly answered out of questions.

    Results:

    You did great! Your knowledge of the differences between the sexes should serve you well.

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    You know your X chromosomes from your Y, but there’s more you could learn.

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    Back to the books for you until you get up to speed on the differences between men and women.

Sources | Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, MS, DO on August 20, 2018 Medically Reviewed on August 20, 2018

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, MS, DO on
August 20, 2018

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

1) (left to right) Ismail Ciydem / Thinkstock, Shikhar Bhattarai / Thinkstock

 

SOURCES:

National Institutes of Health: “The Genetics of Sex Differences in Brain and Behavior,” “Minireview: Sex chromosomes and brain sexual differentiation,” “Gender differences in relations of mental rotation, verbal fluency, and SAT scores to finger length ratios as hormonal indexes,” “Sex differences in clustering and switching in verbal fluency tasks,” “Gender differences in multitasking reflect spatial ability,” “Why women see differently from the way men see? A review of sex differences in cognition and sports,” “The human cerebral cortex: gender differences in structure and function,” “Sex and Gender Differences in Central Nervous System-Related Disorders,” “Gender differences in pharmacological response,” “Raphe serotonin neuron-specific oxytocin receptor knockout reduces aggression without affecting anxiety-like behavior in male mice only.”

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