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Can the pill affect your cholesterol levels?

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Women who take certain birth control pills may see a change in some of their blood fats that play a role in heart disease. For example your levels of HDL "good" cholesterol could go down. At the same time, your triglycerides and LDL "bad" cholesterol may go up. This may cause a gradual buildup of a fatty substance called plaque inside your arteries. Over time, that can reduce or block the flow of blood to your heart and cause a heart attack or a type of chest pain called angina.

SOURCES:

Association of Reproductive Health Professionals: "Hormonal Contraception."

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: "Heart Disease Fact Sheet."

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: "Combined Hormonal Birth Control: Pill, Patch, and Ring."

American Heart Association: "Birth Control and Heart Disease."

Mayo Clinic: "Healthy Lifestyle Birth Control."

National Institutes of Health: "Contraceptive Hormone Use and Cardiovascular Disease."

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: "High Cholesterol."

American Family Physician: "Contraception Choices in Women with Underlying Medical Conditions."

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: "The Healthy Heart Handbook for Women."

Reviewed by Nivin Todd on June 03, 2018

SOURCES:

Association of Reproductive Health Professionals: "Hormonal Contraception."

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: "Heart Disease Fact Sheet."

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: "Combined Hormonal Birth Control: Pill, Patch, and Ring."

American Heart Association: "Birth Control and Heart Disease."

Mayo Clinic: "Healthy Lifestyle Birth Control."

National Institutes of Health: "Contraceptive Hormone Use and Cardiovascular Disease."

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: "High Cholesterol."

American Family Physician: "Contraception Choices in Women with Underlying Medical Conditions."

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: "The Healthy Heart Handbook for Women."

Reviewed by Nivin Todd on June 03, 2018

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What can raise your chances of heart disease and other complications?

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