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How are today's birth control pills different?

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When birth control pills were first sold in the early 1960s, they had very high levels of estrogen and progestin. Estrogen in high doses can cause weight gain due to increased appetite and fluid retention. So, 50 years ago they may indeed have caused weight gain in some women.

Current birth control pills have much lower amounts of hormones. So weight gain is not likely to be a problem.

SOURCES:

Planned Parenthood: "History & Successes;”  “Birth Control Q&A;” and “Birth Control Pill.”

4Parents.gov: "Birth Control Chart."

MedicineNet: “Birth Control Myths” and “Oral Contraceptives, Birth Control Pills.”

University of Cincinnati: “UC HEALTH LINE: Oral Contraceptive Myths.”

Mayo Clinic: “Edema: Causes” and “Birth Control Pill FAQ: Benefits, Risks and Choices.”

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on February 16, 2019

SOURCES:

Planned Parenthood: "History & Successes;”  “Birth Control Q&A;” and “Birth Control Pill.”

4Parents.gov: "Birth Control Chart."

MedicineNet: “Birth Control Myths” and “Oral Contraceptives, Birth Control Pills.”

University of Cincinnati: “UC HEALTH LINE: Oral Contraceptive Myths.”

Mayo Clinic: “Edema: Causes” and “Birth Control Pill FAQ: Benefits, Risks and Choices.”

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on February 16, 2019

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