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How can you choose the right birth control for your teen?

ANSWER

It can be hard to talk to your teen about sex and birth control. Her doctor can help get the conversation started and either prescribe what she needs or refer you to a specialist.

In some states, teens can decide for themselves if they want birth control. They don’t need a parent's consent.

While most birth control methods require the girl to take action, boys should take responsibility, too. They should wear a condom during sex to prevent pregnancy and the spread of STDs.

SOURCES:

News release, CDC.

CDC: "Genital HPV Infection -- Fact Sheet."

American Academy of Pediatrics: "Birth Control for Sexually Active Teens."

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: "FAQ112 Especially for Teens: Birth Control."

Pediatrics , September 2014.

Guttmacher Institute State Policies in Brief: "Minors' Access to Contraceptive Services."  

TeensHealth: “What Kinds of Birth Control Work Best Against Pregnancy and STDs?”

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on May 04, 2018

SOURCES:

News release, CDC.

CDC: "Genital HPV Infection -- Fact Sheet."

American Academy of Pediatrics: "Birth Control for Sexually Active Teens."

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: "FAQ112 Especially for Teens: Birth Control."

Pediatrics , September 2014.

Guttmacher Institute State Policies in Brief: "Minors' Access to Contraceptive Services."  

TeensHealth: “What Kinds of Birth Control Work Best Against Pregnancy and STDs?”

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on May 04, 2018

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What are the odds of getting pregnant if you use natural birth control method?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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