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How do you take continuous-use combination pills for birth control?

ANSWER

You take an active pill every day and never have a period. You might have breakthrough bleeding, especially at first.

You may want fewer periods or none at all, especially if you have problem periods. But you may wonder how you’ll know if you get pregnant by accident.

If you think you could be, take a pregnancy test. They work even if you're taking the pill. If the test is positive, stop taking your pills and call your doctor.

SOURCES:

Planned Parenthood: “Birth Control Pills.”

The Nemours Foundation: “Birth Control Pill.”

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Population Affairs: “ Birth Control Fact Sheet.”

British National Health Service: “When will my periods come back after I stop taking the pill?

National Women’s Health Resource Center: “Types of Pills.”

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: “Combined Hormonal Birth Control: Pill, Patch, and Ring.”

Association of Reproductive Health Professionals: “Combined Hormonal Contraception: General Information.”

FDA: “FDA Drug Safety Communication: Updated information about the risk of blood clots in women taking birth control pills containing drospirenone.”

Association of Reproductive Health Professionals: “Combined Oral Contraceptive Pills.”

Cleveland Clinic Center for Continuing Education: “Female Contraception.”

Office on Women’s Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: “Menopause Symptom Relief and Treatments.”

The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unwanted Pregnancy: “Pill Perfection: Choosing the Right Pill for You.”

The World Health Organization Reproductive Health Library: “Monophasic versus Multiphasic Oral Contraceptives.”

British National Health Services: “Will a Pregnancy Test Work if I'm on the Pill?”

Association of Reproductive Health Professionals: “Progestin-Only Oral Contraceptives.”

University of Pittsburgh Medical Center: “Birth Control Pills - Progestin-Only Contraceptives.”

Healthy Women: "Type of Pills."

National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy: “Which birth control pill is right for me?”

National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy: “Risky business 2: Migraines, high blood pressure, and blood clots.”

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on December 04, 2017

SOURCES:

Planned Parenthood: “Birth Control Pills.”

The Nemours Foundation: “Birth Control Pill.”

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Population Affairs: “ Birth Control Fact Sheet.”

British National Health Service: “When will my periods come back after I stop taking the pill?

National Women’s Health Resource Center: “Types of Pills.”

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: “Combined Hormonal Birth Control: Pill, Patch, and Ring.”

Association of Reproductive Health Professionals: “Combined Hormonal Contraception: General Information.”

FDA: “FDA Drug Safety Communication: Updated information about the risk of blood clots in women taking birth control pills containing drospirenone.”

Association of Reproductive Health Professionals: “Combined Oral Contraceptive Pills.”

Cleveland Clinic Center for Continuing Education: “Female Contraception.”

Office on Women’s Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: “Menopause Symptom Relief and Treatments.”

The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unwanted Pregnancy: “Pill Perfection: Choosing the Right Pill for You.”

The World Health Organization Reproductive Health Library: “Monophasic versus Multiphasic Oral Contraceptives.”

British National Health Services: “Will a Pregnancy Test Work if I'm on the Pill?”

Association of Reproductive Health Professionals: “Progestin-Only Oral Contraceptives.”

University of Pittsburgh Medical Center: “Birth Control Pills - Progestin-Only Contraceptives.”

Healthy Women: "Type of Pills."

National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy: “Which birth control pill is right for me?”

National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy: “Risky business 2: Migraines, high blood pressure, and blood clots.”

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on December 04, 2017

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What should you know about the mini-pill for birth control?

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