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When is an intrauterine device (IUD) considered an option for emergency contraception?

ANSWER

Emergency contraception helps prevent pregnancy after you’ve had sex. One choice is the copper-T intrauterine device (IUD) that goes inside your body. A nurse or doctor needs to put it in within 5 days of when you had sex. The IUD works as both emergency contraception and as ongoing birth control. It prevents pregnancy as long as it is in place. The copper IUD is the best working form of emergency contraception.

SOURCES:

American Society for Emergency Contraception: "The Cost of Emergency Contraception: Results from a Nationwide Survey."

Anne Elizabeth Burke, MD, associate professor of gynecology and obstetrics, director of family planning, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.

Kelly Cleland, MPA, MPH, researcher, Office of Population Research, Princeton University.

FDA: "FDA approves Plan B One-Step emergency contraceptive for use without a prescription for all women of child-bearing potential."

Alexandra Gold, MD, fellow in family planning, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.

HealthyChildren.org: "Emergency Contraception."

Office of Population Research at Princeton University: The Emergency Contraception Web Site: "Effectiveness," "Safety."

Healthy Canadians web site.

UpToDate.com: "Emergency Contraception." "Intrauterine Contraception."

PlanBOneStep,com.

MyNextChoiceOneDose.com.  

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on June 07, 2018

SOURCES:

American Society for Emergency Contraception: "The Cost of Emergency Contraception: Results from a Nationwide Survey."

Anne Elizabeth Burke, MD, associate professor of gynecology and obstetrics, director of family planning, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.

Kelly Cleland, MPA, MPH, researcher, Office of Population Research, Princeton University.

FDA: "FDA approves Plan B One-Step emergency contraceptive for use without a prescription for all women of child-bearing potential."

Alexandra Gold, MD, fellow in family planning, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.

HealthyChildren.org: "Emergency Contraception."

Office of Population Research at Princeton University: The Emergency Contraception Web Site: "Effectiveness," "Safety."

Healthy Canadians web site.

UpToDate.com: "Emergency Contraception." "Intrauterine Contraception."

PlanBOneStep,com.

MyNextChoiceOneDose.com.  

Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson on June 07, 2018

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What kind of emergency contraception can I get in pill form?

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