0 0
  • Question 1/9

    Your sex drive goes down after a vasectomy.

  • Answer 1/9

    Your sex drive goes down after a vasectomy.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Let’s put this myth to bed. The surgery won’t lighten your libido. You’ll still get erections and enjoy sex like you did before. Only one thing will be different after the surgery: Your semen won’t have any sperm. Some men say a vasectomy makes sex better because they don’t have to plan birth control or worry about pregnancy.

  • Question 1/9

    All vasectomies involve a sharp blade.

  • Answer 1/9

    All vasectomies involve a sharp blade.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    In the traditional operation, your doctor cuts or blocks the tubes that carry sperm from your testicles to your penis. He makes one or two small cuts in your scrotum to get to those tubes. But that’s not the most common way it is done in the US. With newer “no-knife” procedures, a doctor makes a small hole in one side of the scrotum. There’s no need for stitches when it’s done that way.

  • Question 1/9

    How long does a vasectomy take?

  • Answer 1/9

    How long does a vasectomy take?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    You won’t need to stay in the hospital for a vasectomy. It’s a quick, safe, and simple surgery that you usually get in a doctor’s office or outpatient surgery center. You’ll be awake, but your doctor will give you medicine to numb the area. Typically, the most you’ll feel is a slight tugging or pulling.

  • Question 1/9

    After a vasectomy, your body absorbs sperm.

  • Answer 1/9

    After a vasectomy, your body absorbs sperm.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Your testicles will still make sperm after the surgery. You just won’t release them when you ejaculate. When sperm cells die, your body absorbs them. That happens with other dead cells, too.

  • Question 1/9

    How long does it take for a vasectomy to work?

  • Answer 1/9

    How long does it take for a vasectomy to work?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    You’ll need backup birth control for a while. It takes time for the sperm to clear out of your body. Your doctor will ask you to bring samples of your semen to checkups after your surgery. You may need to ejaculate 15 to 20 times before all the sperm is gone.  You’ll get the OK to nix backup birth control after you have two samples without sperm. That could take 3 months or longer.

  • Question 1/9

    Wear this kind of underwear right after the operation:

  • Answer 1/9

    Wear this kind of underwear right after the operation:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    After the vasectomy, you might be swollen, bruised, or in a little pain. If you’re a boxer kind of guy, invest in a few pairs of tight briefs or a jock strap. They’ll support your scrotum. It’ll also help to use an ice pack and take it easy while you’re recovering. You should be back to normal within a week or two.

  • Answer 1/9

    Which is more common? 

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Vasectomy is safer, less expensive, and easier to recover from than tubal ligation, when a woman’s fallopian tubes are tied or closed so that sperm and eggs can’t meet. But women get their tubes tied about 2 to 3 times more often than men get vasectomies. Experts think that could be because some men believe the surgery has bad side effects. Only about 6% of men in the U.S. have had a vasectomy.
     

  • Question 1/9

    Vasectomy makes you more likely to get prostate cancer.

  • Answer 1/9

    Vasectomy makes you more likely to get prostate cancer.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    The operation won’t raise your risk for prostate cancer or testicular cancer. Men who’ve had the procedure also aren’t more likely to have heart disease or immune system problems. Talk to your doctor if you’re concerned or have questions.

  • Question 1/9

    It’s easy to reverse a vasectomy.

  • Answer 1/9

    It’s easy to reverse a vasectomy.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    If you think you may want children later, a vasectomy is not for you. It’s meant to be permanent birth control. Surgery to undo it costs a lot and may not work. If you do want a reversal, it’s more likely to work if you have it close to the time of your vasectomy.

  • Your Score:

    Share your score:
    0
    Share your score:
    Your Score:

    You correctly answered out of questions.

    Results:

    Great job. When it comes to vasectomy, you have it tied up!

    Results:

    Well done! You know how to separate vasectomy myths from facts.

    Results:

    Your answers didn’t quite cut it. Study up about vasectomy and take the quiz again for a better result.

Sources | Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, MS, DO on April 18, 2017 Medically Reviewed on April 18, 2017

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, MS, DO on
April 18, 2017

IMAGE PROVIDED BY Getty Images

SOURCES:

American Urological Association: “Vasectomy.”

CDC: “Contraception.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Vasectomy.”

Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development: “How is a Vasectomy Done?”

Familydoctor.org: “Vasectomy: What to Expect.”

International Planned Parenthood Federation: “Vasectomy.”

Planned Parenthood: “Sterilization for Women.”

UCLA Health: “Vasectomy: Elective Male Sterilization, What is a Vasectomy?”

University of Rochester Medical Center: “Vasectomy.”

Uptodate: “Overview of vasectomy.” “Patient Information: Vasectomy (Beyond the Basics.)”

The WHO Reproductive Health Library: “Scalpel vs. no-scalpel incision for vasectomy.”

UpToDate.

This tool does not provide medical advice.
See additional information.

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.