PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What should you do if there are changes in HPV (human papillomavirus) infection?

ANSWER

If the HPV infection has caused abnormal cell changes that could lead to cervical cancer, your doctor might want to take a wait-and-see approach. Sometimes the cell changes -- called cervical dysplasia, precancerous cell changes, or cervical intraepithelial neoplasia -- will heal on their own.

From: What’s the Treatment for HPV? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

CDC: "Genital HPV Infection-CDC Fact Sheet."

American Social Health Association: "HPV: Cervical Dysplasia: Questions & Answers."

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: "Human Papillomavirus."

Joan Walker, MD, Gynecologic Oncologist, University of Oklahoma Health Science Center, Oklahoma City.

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: "Human Papillomavirus and Genital Warts."

Diane Harper, MD, MPH, Professor of Community and Family Medicine and Obstetrics and Gynecology, Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, N.H.

Joseph Bocchini, MD, Chairman, Committee on Infectious Diseases, American Academy of Pediatrics; Chief of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport.

American Social Health Association fact sheets: "HPV: Myths and Misconceptions," "HPV: Genital Warts: Questions and Answers," and "HPV: Cervical Dysplasia Questions & Answers." 

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on August 28, 2019

SOURCES:

CDC: "Genital HPV Infection-CDC Fact Sheet."

American Social Health Association: "HPV: Cervical Dysplasia: Questions & Answers."

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: "Human Papillomavirus."

Joan Walker, MD, Gynecologic Oncologist, University of Oklahoma Health Science Center, Oklahoma City.

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: "Human Papillomavirus and Genital Warts."

Diane Harper, MD, MPH, Professor of Community and Family Medicine and Obstetrics and Gynecology, Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, N.H.

Joseph Bocchini, MD, Chairman, Committee on Infectious Diseases, American Academy of Pediatrics; Chief of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport.

American Social Health Association fact sheets: "HPV: Myths and Misconceptions," "HPV: Genital Warts: Questions and Answers," and "HPV: Cervical Dysplasia Questions & Answers." 

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on August 28, 2019

NEXT QUESTION:

How are abnormal cells in HPV (human papillomavirus) treated?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.