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How does contact dermatitis develop?

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Contact dermatitis is a form of eczema, a common problem that makes you skin get inflamed. There are two types of contact dermatitis:

You’re most likely to get contact dermatitis in your hands.

  • Irritant contact dermatitis (set off by touching chemicals or other strong irritants)
  • Allergic contact dermatitis (triggered by allergic reaction to nickel, cosmetics. poison ivy and other things)

From: Types of Eczema WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Habif, T. , 5th edition, Mosby, 2009. Clinical Dermatology

Hanifin, J. , June 2007. Dermatitis

National Institutes of Health: "Handout on Health -- Atopic Dermatitis."

Cleveland Clinic: , 2nd edition. Current Clinical Medicine

American Academy of Dermatology: "Nummular Dermatitis," "Dermatitis."

American Academy of Family Physicians: "Seborrheic Dermatitis."

American Academy of Dermatology: "What is Eczema?"

FDA: “FDA approves new eczema drug .” Dupixent

 

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on July 3, 2019

SOURCES:

Habif, T. , 5th edition, Mosby, 2009. Clinical Dermatology

Hanifin, J. , June 2007. Dermatitis

National Institutes of Health: "Handout on Health -- Atopic Dermatitis."

Cleveland Clinic: , 2nd edition. Current Clinical Medicine

American Academy of Dermatology: "Nummular Dermatitis," "Dermatitis."

American Academy of Family Physicians: "Seborrheic Dermatitis."

American Academy of Dermatology: "What is Eczema?"

FDA: “FDA approves new eczema drug .” Dupixent

 

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on July 3, 2019

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How is irritant contact dermatitis treated?

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