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What are some ways to calm itchy skin from eczema?

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It can take trial and error to find your eczema relief. You have a lot of options:. What works well for one person may not ease your symptoms. It’s a good idea to keep an open mind -- and find lots of options.

  • Creams and ointments moisturize your ski and lower swelling. Petroleum jelly and mineral oil work well since they form a thick barrier over your skin.
  • Coal tar: Extracts of crude tar may be messy and smelly, but it may help soothe your skin.
  • Wet wraps: Gauge or bandages soaked in cool water may relieve your itch. And the moisture will help creams or lotions work better.
  • Hydrocortisone creams are a steroid that helps keep redness, itching, and swelling at bay. Some are sold over the counter and other require a prescription.
  • Prescription medications that you apply to the skin to treat eczema flares.

SOURCES:

National Eczema Association: “Hydrocortisone FAQs,” “Psychodermatology,” “Alternate Routes: Acupuncture, Acupressure, and Eczema,”

Van den Bogaard, J. published Jan. 25, 2013. Journal of Clinical Investigation,

Eichenfield, L. July 2014. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology,

Cleveland Clinic: “Diseases and Conditions: Eczema.”

Slutsky, J. , October 2010. Journal of Drugs in Dermatology

American Academy of Dermatology: “Atopic Dermatitis: Bleach Bath Therapy,” “Atopic Dermatitis: Recommendations for the Use of Systemic Antihistamines.”

American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology: “Bleach Bath Recipe for Skin Conditions.”

News release, Northwestern University.                                

Harvard Medical School: “Recognizing the Mind-Skin Connection.”

National Jewish Health: “Eczema Treatment: Wet Wrap Therapy of Atopic Dermatitis.”

Medline Plus: “Hydrocortisone Topical.”

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on June 4, 2018

SOURCES:

National Eczema Association: “Hydrocortisone FAQs,” “Psychodermatology,” “Alternate Routes: Acupuncture, Acupressure, and Eczema,”

Van den Bogaard, J. published Jan. 25, 2013. Journal of Clinical Investigation,

Eichenfield, L. July 2014. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology,

Cleveland Clinic: “Diseases and Conditions: Eczema.”

Slutsky, J. , October 2010. Journal of Drugs in Dermatology

American Academy of Dermatology: “Atopic Dermatitis: Bleach Bath Therapy,” “Atopic Dermatitis: Recommendations for the Use of Systemic Antihistamines.”

American Academy of Allergy Asthma and Immunology: “Bleach Bath Recipe for Skin Conditions.”

News release, Northwestern University.                                

Harvard Medical School: “Recognizing the Mind-Skin Connection.”

National Jewish Health: “Eczema Treatment: Wet Wrap Therapy of Atopic Dermatitis.”

Medline Plus: “Hydrocortisone Topical.”

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on June 4, 2018

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