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What can you do at home to control both eczema and acne?

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  • Taking good care of your skin can help control both eczema and acne. These things can help: Be gentle. Use a mild soap to wash your skin at least twice a day and after sweaty exercise. Go easy. Scrubbing or using harsh cleaners can make it worse. Try not to touch the area. If you have itchy eczema, try not to scratch. This can break your skin and lead to infections. If you have pimples, don't pick or pop them.
  • Stay safe in the sun. Some drugs for eczema and acne make your skin burn faster. Try to stay out of the sun between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. when the sun's UVB burning rays are most intense. If you have eczema, use a mineral-based sunscreen with zinc oxide or titanium dioxide. People with acne do best with a brand that's oil-free or "non-comedogenic," meaning it won't block your pores.
  • Relax. Stress and anxiety can make both acne and eczema flare up. Try meditation, take a yoga or tai chi class, or find other ways to calm yourself. Put your best face forward. If your skin condition makes you self-conscious, you may want to wear makeup to help cover it, but you need to use the right products. Some makeup can help absorb oil, others cover up redness and smooth out your skin. Ask your doctor about what would be best for you.

From: Eczema vs. Acne: Which Is It? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: "What is Acne: Fast Facts."

National Eczema Society: "What is Eczema?"

National Eczema Association: "You're not alone," "Atopic dermatitis: All in the Family?" "Sun Protection," "Sunscreen."

American Academy of Dermatology: "Adult acne," "Atopic dermatitis," "Reducing stress may help lead to clearer skin," "Proper skin care lays the foundation for successful acne and rosacea treatment."

DermNet New Zealand: "Complications of atopic dermatitis."

Mayo Clinic: "Acne," "Atopic dermatitis (Eczema)," "Helping Stop Pimples."

American Family Physician: "Diagnosis and Treatment of Acne."

National Jewish Health: "Eczema: Treatment," "Wet Wrap Therapy."

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on January 29, 2019

SOURCES:

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: "What is Acne: Fast Facts."

National Eczema Society: "What is Eczema?"

National Eczema Association: "You're not alone," "Atopic dermatitis: All in the Family?" "Sun Protection," "Sunscreen."

American Academy of Dermatology: "Adult acne," "Atopic dermatitis," "Reducing stress may help lead to clearer skin," "Proper skin care lays the foundation for successful acne and rosacea treatment."

DermNet New Zealand: "Complications of atopic dermatitis."

Mayo Clinic: "Acne," "Atopic dermatitis (Eczema)," "Helping Stop Pimples."

American Family Physician: "Diagnosis and Treatment of Acne."

National Jewish Health: "Eczema: Treatment," "Wet Wrap Therapy."

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on January 29, 2019

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