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What can you do to take care of your skin at home to manage eczema?

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Try these tips:

  • Bathe only in warm water. Hot water dries out skin.
  • Wash with a gentle cleanser instead of soap. Don't use body scrubbers or washcloths, which can be irritating. Pat dry with a soft towel instead of rubbing, and be sure to leave your skin damp. Apply moisturizers daily. Do it right after you bathe or wash your hands. Choose fragrance-free moisturizers that won't irritate you. Try using a thicker skin cream or ointment that has more oil at night, and wear cotton gloves or socks to lock in moisture. Gloves can also keep you from scratching in your sleep.
  • Avoid too much bathing and hand washing. It will dry out your skin. Steer clear of alcohol-based hand cleaners, too.
  • Limit your contact with skin irritants. Household cleaners, laundry detergents, perfumed soaps, bubble baths, cosmetics, and many other things can make eczema worse. Learn what irritates your skin so you can avoid it.
  • Choose cotton clothes that fit comfortably. Wool and synthetic fibers can irritate skin. Be sure to wash new clothes before you wear them for the first time. Use fragrance-free laundry soap, and rinse your laundry thoroughly.
  • Avoid getting overheated. When you’re hot and sweaty, it can trigger itching and scratching. After a workout, rinse off right away in a warm shower.
  • Know your triggers. Many people with eczema react to allergens such as pollen, dust mites, animal dander, and mold. Ease stress. It can be hard to find time to relax, but lowering your stress level will help you avoid symptom flare-ups.

SOURCES:

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: "Atopic Dermatitis."

Buys, L. February 15, 2007 American Family Physician;

EczemaNet: "Eczema Treatments."

PubmedHealth: "Atopic Eczema."

EczemaNet: "Bathing and Moisturizing Guidelines."

EczemaNet: "Preventing Flare-Ups."

EczemaNet: "Medications and Other Therapies for Eczema."

Patel, T. 2007. American Journal of Clinical Dermatology;

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on March 19, 2017

SOURCES:

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: "Atopic Dermatitis."

Buys, L. February 15, 2007 American Family Physician;

EczemaNet: "Eczema Treatments."

PubmedHealth: "Atopic Eczema."

EczemaNet: "Bathing and Moisturizing Guidelines."

EczemaNet: "Preventing Flare-Ups."

EczemaNet: "Medications and Other Therapies for Eczema."

Patel, T. 2007. American Journal of Clinical Dermatology;

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on March 19, 2017

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