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  • Question 1/11

    What's the best way to wash your skin?

  • Answer 1/11

    What's the best way to wash your skin?

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    If you have eczema, it's best that you take short baths or showers in warm water. Use gentle cleansers instead of soap, and pat, don't rub, your skin dry. Then apply any medicines to your skin and moisturize while skin is still damp. You can also soak in lukewarm water and baking soda or oatmeal for 10 minutes, which will help the skin absorb water. Ask your health care provider about other ways to help with itching.

  • Question 1/11

    What's probably the most important thing you can do for your eczema?

  • Answer 1/11

    What's probably the most important thing you can do for your eczema?

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    • Correct Answer:

    Moisturizing is important for eczema. Creams and ointments have less water than lotions, so they're usually more effective at sealing in moisture. Even petroleum jelly is good after a bath. Use unscented products so fragrances don't irritate skin. Moisturize at least twice a day, especially after bathing.

  • Question 1/11

    Can stress and sunburn affect your eczema?

  • Answer 1/11

    Can stress and sunburn affect your eczema?

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    • Correct Answer:

    Many different things can cause eczema to get worse, even for children. Being stressed -- before a test or a big game, for example -- may trigger eczema. Being hot can make you sweat, which can irritate skin. Sunburn can make skin even itchier, so always use sunscreen.

  • Question 1/11

    What you wear can affect your eczema.

  • Answer 1/11

    What you wear can affect your eczema.

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    • Correct Answer:

    Try to avoid coarse or irritating fabrics like wool. They can make skin itchy and irritate eczema. Instead, choose loose, comfortable, breathable fabrics like cotton that are less likely to bother skin.

  • Question 1/11

    Allergies may affect your child's eczema.

  • Answer 1/11

    Allergies may affect your child's eczema.

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    • Correct Answer:

    Having allergies like milk protein allergy can make your child's eczema worse. Food allergies may be more common in infants and young children with eczema. Environmental allergies may be more common in older kids. Milk proteins are found in baby formula as well as breast milk -- if a nursing mother drinks milk products. Some children may outgrow eczema caused by allergies. If allergies are an issue, your pediatrician may refer you to an allergist.

  • Question 1/11

    Children can outgrow eczema.

  • Answer 1/11

    Children can outgrow eczema.

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    The good news is that about half of all children with eczema will outgrow it by the time they're teenagers. They may continue to have dry, easily irritated skin, and a few will continue to have eczema when they are older.

  • Question 1/11

    It's OK to gently scratch or rub your eczema.

  • Answer 1/11

    It's OK to gently scratch or rub your eczema.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Scratching and rubbing can make eczema worse and make your skin more prone to infection. Instead, when eczema itches, apply cool, wet washcloths to your skin to help relieve discomfort, then always moisturize to seal the water in. Help your child keep his fingernails short to minimize breaking the skin if he scratches.

  • Question 1/11

    Call a healthcare provider if your child has eczema and:

  • Answer 1/11

    Call a healthcare provider if your child has eczema and:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Fever, redness and warmth, or pus-filled bumps all could be signs that your child has a secondary skin infection. Call your child's doctor immediately because children with eczema are prone to skin infections.

  • Question 1/11

    Your doctor may recommend the following treatment if you have eczema:

  • Answer 1/11

    Your doctor may recommend the following treatment if you have eczema:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Topical steroid creams -- are commonly used to help soothe eczema symptoms. Antihistamines may be recommended to relieve itching and help with sleep. Antibiotics are used to treat secondary infections.

  • Question 1/11

    You can help relieve eczema symptoms in the laundry room.

  • Answer 1/11

    You can help relieve eczema symptoms in the laundry room.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    To help avoid irritating your skin, use mild laundry detergent without fragrances or dyes and rinse clothes twice to remove all soap. It's also a good idea to wash new clothes before you wear them in order to remove potentially irritating chemicals.

  • Question 1/11

    Wearing gloves to bed can discourage your child from scratching.

  • Answer 1/11

    Wearing gloves to bed can discourage your child from scratching.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Keep your child's fingernails clipped short to minimize damage from scratching. It also may help to have her wear comfortable, lightweight cotton gloves to bed if she scratches when she sleeps.

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    Great job! You understand how to manage eczema and control itching.

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Sources | Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner, MD on June 22, 2017 Medically Reviewed on June 22, 2017

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner, MD on
June 22, 2017

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

Ruth Jenkinson / Dorling Kindersley

REFERENCES:

National Eczema Association: "All About Atopic Dermatitis," "Bathing and Moisturizing," "Atopic Dermatitis in Children."
American Academy of Dermatology: "Atopic Dermatitis."
KidsHealth: "Eczema."
FamilyDoctor: "Eczema: Tips on How to Care for Your Skin."
University of Wisconsin-Madison Health: "The Benefits of Drinking Water for Your Skin."
PubMed Health: "Atopic eczema."
American Osteopathic College of Dermatology: "Eczema/Atopic Dermatitis."
National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: "Atopic Dermatitis."
UpToDate: "Role of Allergy in Atopic Dermatitis."
This tool does not provide medical advice.

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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