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What should I know about hair loss?

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Hair grows everywhere on the human skin except on the palms of our hands and the soles of our feet, but many hairs are so fine they're virtually invisible. Hair is made up of a protein called keratin that is produced in hair follicles in the outer layer of skin. As follicles produce new hair cells, old cells are being pushed out through the surface of the skin at the rate of about six inches a year. The hair you can see is actually a string of dead keratin cells. The average adult head has about 100,000 to 150,000 hairs and loses up to 100 of them every day; finding a few stray hairs on your hairbrush is not necessarily cause for alarm.

SOURCES: 

American Society for Dermatologic Surgery. 

American Academy of Family Physicians.

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on October 13, 2017

SOURCES: 

American Society for Dermatologic Surgery. 

American Academy of Family Physicians.

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on October 13, 2017

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How is the hair loss cycle divided?

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