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How is psoriasis treated if you are pregnant?

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You may find that your skin clears up when you're expecting a baby. Or it may get worse. Either way, your doctor probably will be very careful in treating your psoriasis while you're pregnant. Try over-the-counter moisturizers or petroleum jelly first. Steroid creams also appear to be safe. But you should avoid tazarotene, a topical retinoid made from vitamin A. Retinoids in pill form are extremely dangerous if you're pregnant. Acitretin can cause serious birth defects. Because it stays in your system a while, you shouldn't try to get pregnant for at least three years after you take it. Methotrexate can also cause a miscarriage or birth defects. Men should wait at least three months and women four months after stopping it before they try to have a baby. Biologic drugs haven't been studied in pregnant women, so talk with your doctor about them. You can pass some medicines to your baby through breast milk. Don't take cyclosporine, methotrexate, or apremilast while you're nursing, and don't use steroid creams on your breasts. Light therapy that uses UVB rays is safe when you're pregnant, but the method called PUVA can cause birth defects. It combines medicine called psoralen with exposure to UVA rays. Women and men shouldn't use this if they're trying to conceive, and women who are pregnant or breastfeeding shouldn't, either.

SOURCES:

National Psoriasis Foundation.

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: "Questions and Answers About Psoriasis," "Psoriatic Arthritis."

American Academy of Dermatology: "Psoriasis."

UptoDate: "Treatment of psoriasis," "Patient education: Psoriasis (Beyond the Basics)."

Al-Mutairi, N. March 2016. Cutis,

Gisondi, P. May 2015. Global Dermatology,

Malhotra, A. December 2012. Evidence-Based Medicine,

Buysschaert, M. July 2014. British Journal of Dermatology,

Hogan, A. November 2011. Diabetologia,

Hwang, J. February 2014. Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews,

van der Linden, M. 2009. Drug Safety,

Hengge, U. January 2006. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology,

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on July 12, 2019

SOURCES:

National Psoriasis Foundation.

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: "Questions and Answers About Psoriasis," "Psoriatic Arthritis."

American Academy of Dermatology: "Psoriasis."

UptoDate: "Treatment of psoriasis," "Patient education: Psoriasis (Beyond the Basics)."

Al-Mutairi, N. March 2016. Cutis,

Gisondi, P. May 2015. Global Dermatology,

Malhotra, A. December 2012. Evidence-Based Medicine,

Buysschaert, M. July 2014. British Journal of Dermatology,

Hogan, A. November 2011. Diabetologia,

Hwang, J. February 2014. Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews,

van der Linden, M. 2009. Drug Safety,

Hengge, U. January 2006. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology,

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on July 12, 2019

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What are the different types of pustular psoriasis?

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