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What are the different types of pustular psoriasis?

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There are three types of pustular psoriasis, based on where the blister outbreaks are or how fast they popped up. They include:

  • Palmoplantar pustulosis: Blisters form on small areas of your body, usually your palms or the soles of your feet. These pus-filled spots can turn brown, peel off, or crust over. Your skin can crack, too. This type of psoriasis may come and go. People who smoke are more likely to get this form.
  • Acropustulosis: Small, very painful lesions pop up on your fingertips or toes. The pain can make it hard to use your fingers or toes. In rare cases, it can cause nail or even bone damage.
  • Generalized or Von Zumbusch: Red, painful, tender skin blotches show up over a wide area of your body, and pus-filled blisters pop up soon after. Your skin may be very itchy. You also might be very tired or have fever, chills, dehydration, nausea, weak muscles, headache, joint pain, fast pulse, or weight loss. This is a rare, serious disease -- see your doctor right away if you have these symptoms.

From: What Is Pustular Psoriasis? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Psoriasis Foundation.

Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis Alliance: "Pustular Psoriasis."

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: "Questions and answers about psoriasis."

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center: "Pustular psoriasis."

American Academy of Dermatology: "Psoriasis: Diagnosis and Treatment."

Dermnet New Zealand: "Generalised pustular psoriasis."

Reviewed by Debra Jaliman on February 22, 2017

SOURCES:

National Psoriasis Foundation.

Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis Alliance: "Pustular Psoriasis."

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: "Questions and answers about psoriasis."

Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center: "Pustular psoriasis."

American Academy of Dermatology: "Psoriasis: Diagnosis and Treatment."

Dermnet New Zealand: "Generalised pustular psoriasis."

Reviewed by Debra Jaliman on February 22, 2017

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What causes and triggers pustular psoriasis?

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