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Do people with HIV/AIDS get Kaposi's sarcoma?

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Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is a form of cancer on the skin and in mucous membranes. It's related to a herpes-type virus. It appears as purplish or dark lesions on the skin.

KS can spread quickly to other parts of the body, including internal organs, when HIV weakens the immune system. Treating the HIV usually restores the immune system enough to cure the KS.

SOURCES:

AIDS.gov: "HIV Doesn't Cause Cancer, but It Can Increase Your Risk."

AIDS.gov: "Opportunistic Infections and Their Relationship to HIV/AIDS."

MedlinePlus: "Kaposi's Sarcoma."

National Cancer Institute: "General Information About Kaposi Sarcoma."

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "HIV/AIDS and Skin Conditions."

Medscape: "Cutaneous Manifestations of HIV."

 

 

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on September 12, 2018

SOURCES:

AIDS.gov: "HIV Doesn't Cause Cancer, but It Can Increase Your Risk."

AIDS.gov: "Opportunistic Infections and Their Relationship to HIV/AIDS."

MedlinePlus: "Kaposi's Sarcoma."

National Cancer Institute: "General Information About Kaposi Sarcoma."

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "HIV/AIDS and Skin Conditions."

Medscape: "Cutaneous Manifestations of HIV."

 

 

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on September 12, 2018

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Do people with HIV/AIDS get oral hairy leukoplakia?

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