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How can cutting out or down on some foods or drinks help with body odor?

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Foods that tend to make you sweat more, such as hot peppers or other spicy foods, can contribute to body odor. And the aroma of foods such as onions or garlic can be carried in the sweat, making you smell bad. Drinks with caffeine or alcohol may also make you sweat more.

From: 6 Tips for Reducing Body Odor WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Patricia Farris, MD, clinical assistant professor of dermatology, Tulane University, New Orleans; spokeswoman, American Academy of Dermatology.

Eric Schweiger, MD, assistant clinical professor of dermatology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York City.

WebMD Medical Reference: "Preventing Body Odor."

Dee Anna Glaser, MD, professor of dermatology, vice chairwoman, department of dermatology, St. Louis University School of Medicine; president, International Hyperhidrosis Society.

International Hyperhidrosis Society: "Ask the Expert."

Havlicek, J. October 2006. Chemical Senses,

Porter, R. , August 1986. Chemical Senses

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on April 9, 2018

SOURCES:

Patricia Farris, MD, clinical assistant professor of dermatology, Tulane University, New Orleans; spokeswoman, American Academy of Dermatology.

Eric Schweiger, MD, assistant clinical professor of dermatology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York City.

WebMD Medical Reference: "Preventing Body Odor."

Dee Anna Glaser, MD, professor of dermatology, vice chairwoman, department of dermatology, St. Louis University School of Medicine; president, International Hyperhidrosis Society.

International Hyperhidrosis Society: "Ask the Expert."

Havlicek, J. October 2006. Chemical Senses,

Porter, R. , August 1986. Chemical Senses

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on April 9, 2018

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