PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

How can I use tea tree oil to treat athlete's foot at home?

ANSWER

This oil comes from the leaves of a tree that grows in Australia. Because it can kill some types of bacteria and fungus, people have used it as a home remedy for many years.

When rubbed into the skin twice a day, tea tree oil can reduce the itching, scaling, swelling, and burning of athlete’s foot. But it may take up to a month to see progress and it doesn’t work for everyone.

Tea tree oil can cause a skin rash or trigger allergies. So talk with your doctor before you try it. She can suggest a tea tree product for you to try, or explain how to dilute the oil to avoid side effects.

Never take tea tree oil by mouth since it can be toxic.

SOURCES:

U.S. National Library of Medicine, “How effective are athlete’s foot treatments?”

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, “Tea Tree Oil.”

International Journal of Dermatology : “Oil of Bitter Orange: New Topical Antifungal Agent.”

The Australasian Journal of Dermatology : “Treatment of interdigital tinea pedis with 25% and 50% tea tree oil solution.”

Clinical Microbiology ReviewsMelaleuca alternifolia: “  (Tea Tree) Oil: a Review of Antimicrobial and Other Medicinal Properties.”

Mycoses: “ Efficacy of ajoene, an organosulphur derived from garlic, in the short-term therapy of tinea pedis.”

Cleveland Clinic Wellness, “Sunflower Oil.”

Ikeda, S. (Edinburgh, Scotland.) June-September 2013. Foot

Natural Health Research Institute, “Benefits of Green Tea Foot Baths.”

Johnston, C. 2006. Medscape General Medicine,

 

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on November 27, 2018

SOURCES:

U.S. National Library of Medicine, “How effective are athlete’s foot treatments?”

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, “Tea Tree Oil.”

International Journal of Dermatology : “Oil of Bitter Orange: New Topical Antifungal Agent.”

The Australasian Journal of Dermatology : “Treatment of interdigital tinea pedis with 25% and 50% tea tree oil solution.”

Clinical Microbiology ReviewsMelaleuca alternifolia: “  (Tea Tree) Oil: a Review of Antimicrobial and Other Medicinal Properties.”

Mycoses: “ Efficacy of ajoene, an organosulphur derived from garlic, in the short-term therapy of tinea pedis.”

Cleveland Clinic Wellness, “Sunflower Oil.”

Ikeda, S. (Edinburgh, Scotland.) June-September 2013. Foot

Natural Health Research Institute, “Benefits of Green Tea Foot Baths.”

Johnston, C. 2006. Medscape General Medicine,

 

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on November 27, 2018

NEXT QUESTION:

How can I use bitter orange to treat athlete's foot at home?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

    Other Answers On: