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How does a free flap procedure work?

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A free flap procedure is often performed during breast reconstruction or following surgery to remove head or neck cancer. During the procedure, muscle, skin, or bone is transferred along with the original blood supply from one area of the body (donor site) to the surgical site in order to reconstruct the area. The procedure often involves the use of microsurgery. Healing of the surgical site can be slow and require frequent wound care. Total recovery may take six to eight weeks or longer.

SOURCES:

TeensHealth: "Plastic Surgery."

American Society of Plastic Surgeons: "Reconstructive Procedures."

American Society of plastic Surgeons: "Wound Care Physician's Counseling Guide."

CDC: "Frequently Asked Questions About Surgical Site Infections."

University of Michigan Health System: "Reconstructive Burn Surgery."

 

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on October 29, 2017

SOURCES:

TeensHealth: "Plastic Surgery."

American Society of Plastic Surgeons: "Reconstructive Procedures."

American Society of plastic Surgeons: "Wound Care Physician's Counseling Guide."

CDC: "Frequently Asked Questions About Surgical Site Infections."

University of Michigan Health System: "Reconstructive Burn Surgery."

 

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on October 29, 2017

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How does tissue expansion help in treating burns and other wounds?

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