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What are some tips to fight body odor?

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If you want to be "odor-free" consider the following tips:

  • Apply an antiperspirant at bedtime. This gives the product a chance to work while you sleep and are not sweating. If you apply antiperspirants after showering in the morning, the sweat you accumulate will wash away the product and render you defenseless against daytime sweating. Remember, deodorants do not prevent sweating. They mainly mask the smell of the sweat on your skin.
  • Keep your underarms dry. Bacteria have a hard time breeding in dry areas of the body.
  • Try a solution of hydrogen peroxide and water to fight body odor. Use 1 teaspoon of peroxide (3%) to 1 cup (8 ounces) of water. Wipe this on affected areas (underarm, feet, groin) with a washcloth. This may help destroy some of the bacteria that creates odor.
  • If sweat from working out is your main cause of body odor, wash your workout clothes often. Sweaty gym clothes are a bacteria-breeding ground.
  • Change your diet. Sometimes, fatty foods, oils, or strong-smelling foods such as garlic, curry, and onions, can seep through your pores and cause body odor (always see a doctor or dietician before making drastic dietary changes).
  • If you have excessive sweating (called hyperhidrosis), talk to your doctor. There are a few treatment options for those with more severe sweating who desire more aggressive treatments. Also, certain medical problems can lead to excessive sweating. Your doctor can make a diagnosis and prescribe treatment.
  • Shaving your underarm regularly will help prevent the accumulation of bacteria and can reduce sweat and odor.

From: Preventing Body Odor WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: Wikipedia web site: "Body Odor." Health 911 web site: "Body Odor Remedies." DermNet NZ web site:  "Antiperspirants".

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on July 26, 2019

SOURCES: Wikipedia web site: "Body Odor." Health 911 web site: "Body Odor Remedies." DermNet NZ web site:  "Antiperspirants".

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on July 26, 2019

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