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What are symptoms of rosacea?

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Rosacea symptoms might flare up for a few weeks, fade, and then come back.

The biggest thing you'll notice is redness on your cheeks, nose, chin, and forehead. Less often, the color can appear on your neck, head, ears, or chest.

After a while, broken blood vessels might show through your skin, which can thicken and swell up. Up to half of people with rosacea also get eye problems like redness, swelling, and pain.

Other symptoms you may get are:

  • Stinging and burning of your skin
  • Patches of rough, dry skin
  • A swollen, bulb-shaped nose
  • Larger pores
  • Broken blood vessels on your eyelids
  • Bumps on your eyelids
  • Problems seeing

From: What Is Rosacea? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Academy of Dermatology: "Rosacea: Signs and Symptoms," "Rosacea: Tips for Managing," "Rosacea: Who Gets and Causes."

Mayo Clinic: "Metronidazole (Oral Route)," "Rosacea: Self-Management," "Rosacea: Symptoms and causes," "Rosacea: Treatment."

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: "Rosacea."

National Rosacea Society: "All About Rosacea," "Coping With Rosacea," "Lasers Used to Treat Some Rosacea Signs," "Understanding Rosacea."

NHS: "Rosacea -- Causes."

National Institutes of Health: "Red in the Face."

National Library of Medicine: "Azelaic Acid Topical."

Reviewed by William Blahd on September 14, 2017

SOURCES:

American Academy of Dermatology: "Rosacea: Signs and Symptoms," "Rosacea: Tips for Managing," "Rosacea: Who Gets and Causes."

Mayo Clinic: "Metronidazole (Oral Route)," "Rosacea: Self-Management," "Rosacea: Symptoms and causes," "Rosacea: Treatment."

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: "Rosacea."

National Rosacea Society: "All About Rosacea," "Coping With Rosacea," "Lasers Used to Treat Some Rosacea Signs," "Understanding Rosacea."

NHS: "Rosacea -- Causes."

National Institutes of Health: "Red in the Face."

National Library of Medicine: "Azelaic Acid Topical."

Reviewed by William Blahd on September 14, 2017

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Who gets rosacea?

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