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What are treatments for lichen sclerosus?

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For lichen sclerosus treatment, your doctor will probably give you a steroid cream to put on the problem area. This can stop the itching, gut it may take weeks or months for the skin to look more normal.

You may need to use these creams or ointments for a long time to keep the condition from coming back.

You’ll need to keep up with your doctor appointments, since long-term use of steroid creams or ointments can redden or thin your skin. The treatment can also cause genital yeast infections.

SOURCES:

American Journal of Clinical Dermatology: “Diagnosis and Treatment of Lichen Sclerosus, An Update.”

National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, “What is Lichen Sclerosus?”

GARD: Genetic and Rare Disease Information Center, National Institutes of Health, “Lichen Sclerosus.”

American Cancer Society, “What are the risk factors for vulvar cancer?”

Mayo Clinic, Diseases and Conditions, “Lichen Sclerosus.”

American Academy of Family Physicians, FamilyDoctor.org, “Lichen Sclerosus.”

Reviewed by Debra Jaliman on September 10, 2020

SOURCES:

American Journal of Clinical Dermatology: “Diagnosis and Treatment of Lichen Sclerosus, An Update.”

National Institutes of Health National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, “What is Lichen Sclerosus?”

GARD: Genetic and Rare Disease Information Center, National Institutes of Health, “Lichen Sclerosus.”

American Cancer Society, “What are the risk factors for vulvar cancer?”

Mayo Clinic, Diseases and Conditions, “Lichen Sclerosus.”

American Academy of Family Physicians, FamilyDoctor.org, “Lichen Sclerosus.”

Reviewed by Debra Jaliman on September 10, 2020

NEXT QUESTION:

How can lichen sclerosus be treated if cortisone cream or ointment doesn’t work?

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