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What causes hereditary angioedema?

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A problem with a gene that controls a blood protein called C1 inhibitor often causes HAE. In most cases, you don’t have enough of this protein. In others, you have normal levels but it doesn't work right. The result is that tiny blood vessels push fluid into nearby areas of your body, which leads to sudden swelling.

For the most common form of HAE, if one of your parents has HAE, you have a 50% change of having it, too. But sometimes the gene change happens for unknown reasons. If you have the broken gene, you can pass it on to your children.

SOURCES:

HAEA: “What is HAE?” "Treating HAE."

AAAAI: “Understanding Hereditary Angioedema.”

Chnniah, N. Australia and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, February 2009.

National Center for Advance Translational Sciences: “Hereditary angioedema.”

National Library of Medicine, Genetics Home Reference: "What is hereditary angioedema?"

NORD: “Angioedema, Hereditary.”

HAECanada: “Frequently Asked Questions.”

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on March 16, 2021

SOURCES:

HAEA: “What is HAE?” "Treating HAE."

AAAAI: “Understanding Hereditary Angioedema.”

Chnniah, N. Australia and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, February 2009.

National Center for Advance Translational Sciences: “Hereditary angioedema.”

National Library of Medicine, Genetics Home Reference: "What is hereditary angioedema?"

NORD: “Angioedema, Hereditary.”

HAECanada: “Frequently Asked Questions.”

Reviewed by Neha Pathak on March 16, 2021

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What are symptoms of hereditary angioedema?

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