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What may be recommended to treat psoriasis on the hands and feet?

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  • Here are some common ways to treat psoriasis on the hands and feet and relieve your symptoms. In addition to moisturizers, mild soaps, and soap substitutes, your doctor may recommend: Coal tar products, like creams, gels, or ointments, to slow skin growth and ease itchy, inflamed, or scaly skin
  • Salicylic acid, a peeling agent that softens or reduces thick scales
  • Corticosteroids, often creams and ointments Combinations of these often work better than one treatment alone. Sometimes doctors suggest alternating or using topical corticosteroids with a type of vitamin D called calcipotriene. This medicine should not be used on the face, so be sure to wear gloves when applying to your hands and feet in order to avoid getting it on your face later.

From: Psoriasis on Hands and Feet WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Di Lernia, V. , 2010. Dermatology Online Journal

FDA. "FDA approves new psoriasis drug Taltz."

FDA. “FDA approves Amjevita, a biosimilar to Humira.”

National Psoriasis Foundation: "Specific locations: Hands and feet."

The Psoriasis Association: "Pustular Psoriasis."

Wound Care Advisor: “What you need to know about hydrocolloid dressings.”

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on October 30, 2017

SOURCES:

Di Lernia, V. , 2010. Dermatology Online Journal

FDA. "FDA approves new psoriasis drug Taltz."

FDA. “FDA approves Amjevita, a biosimilar to Humira.”

National Psoriasis Foundation: "Specific locations: Hands and feet."

The Psoriasis Association: "Pustular Psoriasis."

Wound Care Advisor: “What you need to know about hydrocolloid dressings.”

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on October 30, 2017

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How does hydrocolloid occlusion treat psoriasis on the hands and feet?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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