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When should you see a doctor about kissing bug bites?

ANSWER

If you’re in an area where Chagas disease is a serious health concern and you get a kissing bug bite, see your doctor if:

If you suddenly have trouble breathing, feel dizzy, or vomit, you may have a serious allergic reaction. Call 911 or go to the emergency room right away.

  • You feel like you have a flu with a fever, nausea, or tiredness
  • Your eyelids are swollen
  • The bite looks infected (it’s red, painful, and swollen)

SOURCES:

CDC: “Triatomine Bug FAQs,” “Parasites -- American Trypanosomiasis (also known as Chagas Disease).”

UpToDate: “Reactions to bites from kissing bugs (primarily genus Triatoma),” “Insect Bites.”

Mayo Clinic: “Chagas Disease.”

World Health Organization: “Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis).”

Texas A&M AgriLife Extension: “Conenose or Kissing Bugs.”

Texas A&M University Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences: “Kissing Bugs and Chagas Disease in the United States: A Brief Introduction,” “Kissing Bugs and Chagas Disease in the United States: Found a Kissing Bug?” “Kissing Bugs and Chagas Disease in the United States: FAQ.”

American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology: “Anaphylaxis.”

The University of Arizona: “UA Helps Community with Kissing-Bug Problem.”

Iowa State University: “American Trypanosomiasis.”

 

 

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on December 21, 2017

SOURCES:

CDC: “Triatomine Bug FAQs,” “Parasites -- American Trypanosomiasis (also known as Chagas Disease).”

UpToDate: “Reactions to bites from kissing bugs (primarily genus Triatoma),” “Insect Bites.”

Mayo Clinic: “Chagas Disease.”

World Health Organization: “Chagas disease (American trypanosomiasis).”

Texas A&M AgriLife Extension: “Conenose or Kissing Bugs.”

Texas A&M University Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences: “Kissing Bugs and Chagas Disease in the United States: A Brief Introduction,” “Kissing Bugs and Chagas Disease in the United States: Found a Kissing Bug?” “Kissing Bugs and Chagas Disease in the United States: FAQ.”

American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology: “Anaphylaxis.”

The University of Arizona: “UA Helps Community with Kissing-Bug Problem.”

Iowa State University: “American Trypanosomiasis.”

 

 

Reviewed by Stephanie S. Gardner on December 21, 2017

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How will you know if you're bitten by a kissing bug?

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