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Who gets rosacea?

ANSWER

You're more likely to get rosacea if you:

  • Have light skin, blonde hair, and blue eyes
  • Are age 30-50
  • Are a woman
  • Have family members with rosacea
  • Had severe acne
  • Smoke

From: What Is Rosacea? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Academy of Dermatology: "Rosacea: Signs and Symptoms," "Rosacea: Tips for Managing," "Rosacea: Who Gets and Causes."

Mayo Clinic: "Metronidazole (Oral Route)," "Rosacea: Self-Management," "Rosacea: Symptoms and causes," "Rosacea: Treatment."

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: "Rosacea."

National Rosacea Society: "All About Rosacea," "Coping With Rosacea," "Lasers Used to Treat Some Rosacea Signs," "Understanding Rosacea."

NHS: "Rosacea -- Causes."

National Institutes of Health: "Red in the Face."

National Library of Medicine: "Azelaic Acid Topical."

Reviewed by William Blahd on September 14, 2017

SOURCES:

American Academy of Dermatology: "Rosacea: Signs and Symptoms," "Rosacea: Tips for Managing," "Rosacea: Who Gets and Causes."

Mayo Clinic: "Metronidazole (Oral Route)," "Rosacea: Self-Management," "Rosacea: Symptoms and causes," "Rosacea: Treatment."

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: "Rosacea."

National Rosacea Society: "All About Rosacea," "Coping With Rosacea," "Lasers Used to Treat Some Rosacea Signs," "Understanding Rosacea."

NHS: "Rosacea -- Causes."

National Institutes of Health: "Red in the Face."

National Library of Medicine: "Azelaic Acid Topical."

Reviewed by William Blahd on September 14, 2017

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What medicines treat rosacea?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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