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What is the connection between chickenpox and shingles?

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The same virus, called varicella zoster, causes both chickenpox and shingles. With chickenpox, the virus leaves an itchy, spotted rash all over your body.

After you get over it, the virus stays inside your body. It goes into a sleep-like state. Years later, it can "wake up" and cause shingles.

From: What Are the Symptoms of Shingles? WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Louise Chang on September 08, 2018

Medically Reviewed on 09/08/2018

SOURCES:

American Academy of Dermatology: "Shingles: Signs and Symptoms."

American Academy of Family Physicians: "Shingles Symptoms."

CDC: "Chickenpox (Varicella) Signs & Symptoms," "Shingles Overview."

National Institute on Aging: "Shingles."

Nemours Foundation: "Shingles."

NIH: "Shingles Symptoms and Diagnosis."

Opstelten, W. , July 2005. BMJ

UpToDate: "Patient Information: Shingles (Beyond the Basics)."

National Health Service UK, “Shingles: When to seek medical advice.”

Reviewed by Louise Chang on September 08, 2018

SOURCES:

American Academy of Dermatology: "Shingles: Signs and Symptoms."

American Academy of Family Physicians: "Shingles Symptoms."

CDC: "Chickenpox (Varicella) Signs & Symptoms," "Shingles Overview."

National Institute on Aging: "Shingles."

Nemours Foundation: "Shingles."

NIH: "Shingles Symptoms and Diagnosis."

Opstelten, W. , July 2005. BMJ

UpToDate: "Patient Information: Shingles (Beyond the Basics)."

National Health Service UK, “Shingles: When to seek medical advice.”

Reviewed by Louise Chang on September 08, 2018

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What are early symptoms of shingles?

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