PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

When should I call my doctor about shingles?

ANSWER

Call your doctor if:

�You suspect an outbreak is beginning.

�You have the rash on your face, especially on the nose.

�The area becomes infected with bacteria (spreading redness, swelling, a high fever, and pus).

�Your rash lasts longer than 10 days without improvement.

�The pain becomes too great to bear.

�You have shingles and are in contact with someone who has a weakened immune system.

�You develop any strange symptoms with the shingles rash, such as vertigo, buzzing in your ears, rapid onset weakness, double vision, face droop, or confusion.

From: Understanding Shingles -- Symptoms WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Institute of Neurologic Disorders and Stroke: "Shingles. Seek Early Treatment."

Mayo Clinic Health Letter, p7, June 2002.

Oxman M. June 2, 2005. New England Journal of Medicine,

Douglas M. ,  2004. Drug Safety

WebMD Health News: "Shingles Vaccine to Be Routine at 60."

FDA: "FDA Licenses New Vaccine to Reduce Older Americans' Risk of Shingles."

UpToDate.

 

Reviewed by Sabrina Felson on March 22, 2017

SOURCES:

National Institute of Neurologic Disorders and Stroke: "Shingles. Seek Early Treatment."

Mayo Clinic Health Letter, p7, June 2002.

Oxman M. June 2, 2005. New England Journal of Medicine,

Douglas M. ,  2004. Drug Safety

WebMD Health News: "Shingles Vaccine to Be Routine at 60."

FDA: "FDA Licenses New Vaccine to Reduce Older Americans' Risk of Shingles."

UpToDate.

 

Reviewed by Sabrina Felson on March 22, 2017

NEXT QUESTION:

What is shingles (herpes zoster)?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

"ALEXA, ASK WEBMD"

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.