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How can too little sleep affect insulin?

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When you're low on sleep, your cells don't use it as well as they should. Doctors call this insulin resistance. Over time, your cells don't get enough sugar. Instead, it builds up in your blood. Other things can cause insulin resistance, like too much weight and too little exercise. But sleep loss is a big culprit.

From: Sleep and Type 2 Diabetes WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Metabolismjournal.com: “Sleep influences on obesity, insulin resistance, and risk of type 2 diabetes.”

National Sleep Foundation: “The Link between a Lack of Sleep and Type 2 Diabetes.”

University of California, San Francisco: “Scientists Discover How Gene Mutation Reduces the Need for Sleep.”

Neurology Reviews: “Short Sleep Duration Increases the Risk of All-Cause Mortality.”

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center: “Study Finds Molecular Link Between Insufficient Sleep and Insulin Resistance.”

Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario on March 17, 2020

SOURCES:

Metabolismjournal.com: “Sleep influences on obesity, insulin resistance, and risk of type 2 diabetes.”

National Sleep Foundation: “The Link between a Lack of Sleep and Type 2 Diabetes.”

University of California, San Francisco: “Scientists Discover How Gene Mutation Reduces the Need for Sleep.”

Neurology Reviews: “Short Sleep Duration Increases the Risk of All-Cause Mortality.”

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center: “Study Finds Molecular Link Between Insufficient Sleep and Insulin Resistance.”

Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario on March 17, 2020

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