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What happens to your body temperature when you sleep?

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While you’re sleeping, your body temperature can be 1 to 2 degrees lower than in the daytime. It starts to fall as bedtime approaches, paving the way for a good night’s sleep. Your body also tends to lose heat, which helps you fall and stay asleep. That’s one of the reasons experts say you shouldn’t exercise close to bedtime: Exercise heats you up. We sleep better when we’re cooler. Your temperature starts to rise toward morning, preparing your body for wakefulness.

SOURCES:

American Sleep Association: “What is Sleep?”

Harvard Medical School: “The Characteristics of Sleep.”

National Sleep Foundation: “What Happens When You Sleep?”

Institute of Medicine: “Sleep Disorders and Sleep Deprivation: An Unmet Public Health Problem.”

National Sleep Foundation: “Does Your Body Temperature Change While You Sleep?”

National Sleep Foundation: “The Physiology of Sleep – Thermoregulation & Sleep.”

National Sleep Foundation: “Exercise at This Time of Day for Optimal Sleep.”

University of Washington: “What is Sleep . . . and why do we do it?”

National Sleep Foundation: “The Physiology of Sleep – The Respiratory System.”

Dartmouth College: “Chapter 53: The pharynx and larynx.”

Lung: “Cough and sleep.”

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: “What Is Sleep Apnea?”

American Chemical Society: “So Tired in the Morning... The Science of Sleep.”

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on March 06, 2019

SOURCES:

American Sleep Association: “What is Sleep?”

Harvard Medical School: “The Characteristics of Sleep.”

National Sleep Foundation: “What Happens When You Sleep?”

Institute of Medicine: “Sleep Disorders and Sleep Deprivation: An Unmet Public Health Problem.”

National Sleep Foundation: “Does Your Body Temperature Change While You Sleep?”

National Sleep Foundation: “The Physiology of Sleep – Thermoregulation & Sleep.”

National Sleep Foundation: “Exercise at This Time of Day for Optimal Sleep.”

University of Washington: “What is Sleep . . . and why do we do it?”

National Sleep Foundation: “The Physiology of Sleep – The Respiratory System.”

Dartmouth College: “Chapter 53: The pharynx and larynx.”

Lung: “Cough and sleep.”

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: “What Is Sleep Apnea?”

American Chemical Society: “So Tired in the Morning... The Science of Sleep.”

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on March 06, 2019

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What happens to your breathing when you sleep?

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