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What happens to your breathing when you sleep?

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During non-REM sleep (about 80% of an adult’s sleeping time), you breathe slowly and regularly. But during REM sleep, your breathing rate goes up again. That’s the time we typically dream. Breathing also becomes more shallow and less regular during this sleep phase. Some of it may be due to throat muscles relaxing or to less movement of your rib cage during REM sleep. Whenever you’re sleeping, your oxygen levels are lower and your carbon dioxide levels are higher because your level of breathing goes slightly down.

SOURCES:

American Sleep Association: “What is Sleep?”

Harvard Medical School: “The Characteristics of Sleep.”

National Sleep Foundation: “What Happens When You Sleep?”

Institute of Medicine: “Sleep Disorders and Sleep Deprivation: An Unmet Public Health Problem.”

National Sleep Foundation: “Does Your Body Temperature Change While You Sleep?”

National Sleep Foundation: “The Physiology of Sleep – Thermoregulation & Sleep.”

National Sleep Foundation: “Exercise at This Time of Day for Optimal Sleep.”

University of Washington: “What is Sleep . . . and why do we do it?”

National Sleep Foundation: “The Physiology of Sleep – The Respiratory System.”

Dartmouth College: “Chapter 53: The pharynx and larynx.”

Lung: “Cough and sleep.”

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: “What Is Sleep Apnea?”

American Chemical Society: “So Tired in the Morning... The Science of Sleep.”

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on March 06, 2019

SOURCES:

American Sleep Association: “What is Sleep?”

Harvard Medical School: “The Characteristics of Sleep.”

National Sleep Foundation: “What Happens When You Sleep?”

Institute of Medicine: “Sleep Disorders and Sleep Deprivation: An Unmet Public Health Problem.”

National Sleep Foundation: “Does Your Body Temperature Change While You Sleep?”

National Sleep Foundation: “The Physiology of Sleep – Thermoregulation & Sleep.”

National Sleep Foundation: “Exercise at This Time of Day for Optimal Sleep.”

University of Washington: “What is Sleep . . . and why do we do it?”

National Sleep Foundation: “The Physiology of Sleep – The Respiratory System.”

Dartmouth College: “Chapter 53: The pharynx and larynx.”

Lung: “Cough and sleep.”

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: “What Is Sleep Apnea?”

American Chemical Society: “So Tired in the Morning... The Science of Sleep.”

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on March 06, 2019

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What happens to your heart rate, blood pressure, and blood flow when you sleep?

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