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When do lucid dreams happen?

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Researchers believe that lucid dreams happen several hours into your sleep, in the �deep� rapid eye movement (REM) stage. But they think lucid dreaming may be kind of a �between state� where you aren�t fully lucid but you aren�t quite asleep, either.

From: What Are Lucid Dreams? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Psychological Association: “Reality testing and the mnemonic induction of lucid dreams: Findings from the national Australian lucid dream induction study.”

Boston University: “Lucid Dreaming and the Enigma of Our Consciousness.”

Frontiers in Neuroscience: “Portable Devices to Induce Lucid Dreams—Are They Reliable?” “My Dream, My Rules: Can Lucid Dreaming Treat Nightmares?”

International Journal of Dream Research : “Can we induce lucid dreams? A pharmacological point of view.”

Journal of Sports Sciences: “Effectiveness of motor practice in lucid dreams: a comparison with physical and mental practice.”

National Sleep Foundation: “What is Lucid Dreaming?” “Do Lucid Dreams Affect Sleep Quality?”

Penn State: “Probing Question: What is a lucid dream?”

Scientific Reports: “Frequent lucid dreaming associated with increased functional connectivity between frontopolar cortex and temporoparietal association areas.”

Sleep: “Lucid Dreaming: A State of Consciousness with Features of Both Waking and Non-Lucid Dreaming.”

U.S. National Library of Medicine: “Gray and white matter of the brain.”

University of Adelaide: “Want To Control Your Dreams? Here's How You Can.”

Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry: “Lucid dreams and metacognition: Deliberate thinking and dreaming,” “The seat of meta-consciousness in the brain.”

Nature Reviews Neuroscience : “Anterior prefrontal cortex: insights into function from anatomy and neuroimaging.”

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on January 24, 2020

SOURCES:

American Psychological Association: “Reality testing and the mnemonic induction of lucid dreams: Findings from the national Australian lucid dream induction study.”

Boston University: “Lucid Dreaming and the Enigma of Our Consciousness.”

Frontiers in Neuroscience: “Portable Devices to Induce Lucid Dreams—Are They Reliable?” “My Dream, My Rules: Can Lucid Dreaming Treat Nightmares?”

International Journal of Dream Research : “Can we induce lucid dreams? A pharmacological point of view.”

Journal of Sports Sciences: “Effectiveness of motor practice in lucid dreams: a comparison with physical and mental practice.”

National Sleep Foundation: “What is Lucid Dreaming?” “Do Lucid Dreams Affect Sleep Quality?”

Penn State: “Probing Question: What is a lucid dream?”

Scientific Reports: “Frequent lucid dreaming associated with increased functional connectivity between frontopolar cortex and temporoparietal association areas.”

Sleep: “Lucid Dreaming: A State of Consciousness with Features of Both Waking and Non-Lucid Dreaming.”

U.S. National Library of Medicine: “Gray and white matter of the brain.”

University of Adelaide: “Want To Control Your Dreams? Here's How You Can.”

Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry: “Lucid dreams and metacognition: Deliberate thinking and dreaming,” “The seat of meta-consciousness in the brain.”

Nature Reviews Neuroscience : “Anterior prefrontal cortex: insights into function from anatomy and neuroimaging.”

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on January 24, 2020

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