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  • Answer 1/10

    Melatonin is:

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    Made by the pineal gland in your brain, it plays a key role in keeping your internal body clock running smoothly. As levels of it rise in the evening, you start to feel sleepy. In the morning, as the sun comes up, your melatonin levels get lower and you become more alert. Most people make enough naturally at the right time of day that they don't need a supplement.

  • Question 1/10

    To raise your melatonin levels, you might:

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    To raise your melatonin levels, you might:

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    Other foods that have melatonin include tomatoes, olives, rice, barley, strawberries, cherries, and cow's milk. That might explain why a warm glass of milk before bed is a common home remedy for insomnia. And while a bright light at the flick of a switch is convenient, it may keep your body from knowing when it's time to make more melatonin.

  • Answer 1/10

    Experts recommend melatonin for:

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    While it may help with run-of-the-mill insomnia, the research there is pretty mixed. There's more solid evidence that melatonin works well for people who need to sleep during the daylight hours, have jet lag, or have delayed sleep phase disorders (when your sleep-wake timing cycle is off by several hours).

  • Question 1/10

    Melatonin supplements are available:

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    Melatonin supplements are available:

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    In the U.S. you'll probably find melatonin in the supplement aisle at your local drug store or health food store. Use melatonin supplements with care, following the instructions on the label. If you're thinking of trying them, talk to your doctor first to make sure they're OK for you to take.

  • Answer 1/10

    When it comes to supplements:

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    Most supplements on the market have melatonin that’s made in a lab. That’s because natural melatonin, made from the pineal gland of animals, can be contaminated with a virus. Be sure to check the label to know what you're buying. Something else to think about: Over two-thirds of melatonin supplements have more or less of the hormone than the amount listed. Ask your doctor or pharmacist which brand they recommend.

  • Question 1/10

    Melatonin is safe for children.

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    Melatonin is safe for children.

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    Some studies suggest it's most likely OK to use in children, especially in the short term, but there’s not enough research to know for sure. And doctors don’t know much about the long-term use of melatonin in adults, either. If you choose to use it, think of it as a temporary fix and not a permanent solution.

  • Question 1/10

    One possible side effect is:

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    One possible side effect is:

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    Some people who take melatonin might feel nauseated or drowsy during the day, or they might get a headache. Others have said they feel depressed or like they have a hangover. You might not have any of these problems, but it's wise to be on the lookout. Remember not to drive or operate machinery if you don’t know how melatonin will affect you or if you feel drowsy, no matter the time of day.

  • Answer 1/10

    Don't use melatonin if you have:

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    You should also be extra careful if you take blood thinners, anti-seizure medication, diabetes medication, birth control pills, blood pressure drugs, or immune-suppressing drugs. Melatonin may affect these as well as some other medications and supplements. That's why you should check with your doctor first.

  • Answer 1/10

    The best time to take melatonin is:

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    Melatonin won't knock you out instantly, so it pays to plan ahead. If you're using it to ease jet lag -- one of the best uses for it -- take it 2 hours before your bedtime in the new time zone starting a few days before your trip. Most adults should start with .2 milligrams; if that isn't enough, you can raise your dose slowly (up to 5 milligrams, if necessary).

  • Question 1/10

    Melatonin is often addictive.

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    Melatonin is often addictive.

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    Many people who use other sleep aids start to depend on them after a while, but that doesn't seem to be the case with melatonin. Still, you shouldn't plan on using it indefinitely. If you continue to have trouble falling asleep, make an appointment with a sleep specialist to see what’s going on.

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    You correctly answered out of questions.

    Results:

    Good job! You obviously got a good night’s sleep last night.

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    Not bad, but you might take a nap and try again.

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    Did you sleep through this? Take a nap and try again.

Sources | Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, MS, DO on January 03, 2019 Medically Reviewed on January 03, 2019

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini, MS, DO on
January 03, 2019

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

1. Totojang / Thinkstock Photos

 

SOURCES:

FamilyDoctor.org (American Academy of Family Physicians): "Melatonin."

Harvard Health Letter: "Blue Light Has a Dark Side."

Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine: "Poor Quality Control of Over-the-Counter Melatonin: What They Say Is Often Not What You Get."
Mayo Clinic: "Is Melatonin a Helpful Sleep Aid -- And What Should I Know About Melatonin Side Effects?"

National Sleep Foundation: "Debunking Sleep Myths: Are Natural Sleep Aids Safe?"

NIH National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health: "Melatonin: In Depth."

Sleep.org (National Sleep Foundation): "How to Use Melatonin for Better Sleep," "How Much Melatonin Should You Really Be Taking?" "What is Melatonin?"

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.