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  • Question 1/10

    What’s the ideal length of a nap?

  • Answer 1/10

    What’s the ideal length of a nap?

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    A nap that lasts half an hour or less can lift your mood and make you more alert. Doze longer than that, and you might wake up in the middle of deep sleep, which can leave you with a groggy feeling that’s hard to shake off. Unless you have time to snooze for an entire sleep cycle -- 70-100 minutes -- it’s best to keep naptime short.

  • Question 1/10

    Naps are a smart way to make up for sleepless nights.

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    Naps are a smart way to make up for sleepless nights.

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    A nap the next day can help ease some of the effects of a night with little shut-eye. But don’t depend on them as a regular way to get enough sleep. A midday snooze is not a good long-term solution for people with insomnia or other sleep problems. It’s better to address any issues that keep you from getting quality rest at night.

  • Answer 1/10

    The best time to nap is:

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    Think of the middle of the day (between 1 and 3 p.m.) as the “naptime zone.” If you try to rest too soon after you wake up in the morning, your body probably won’t be ready to fall asleep again. On the other hand, nap too late in the day, and you’ll likely mess up your nighttime rest. Midday -- right after lunch -- is perfect, since this is when your blood sugar and energy naturally slump.

  • Question 1/10

    Why would you take an “emergency” nap?

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    Why would you take an “emergency” nap?

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    When you rest at the same time every day, it’s called a “habitual” nap. A “planned” nap is when you try to work sleep in before you truly need it, like when you know you’ll be up all night. If you start to fall asleep while you’re in the middle of something -- like driving on the highway -- what you need is an “emergency” nap. If you find you need these urgent snoozes often, you’re likely sleep-deprived.

  • Answer 1/10

    The best place to nap is:

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    Just like you would at bedtime, choose an area to nap that will make it easy for you to drift off. Think: dark, quiet, and cool. If you’re at work or traveling and can’t find that ideal spot, think about bringing an eye mask and noise-canceling headphones.

  • Answer 1/10

    During a nap, your brain:

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    Your body might be still when you nap, but your brain is quite active -- and that’s a good thing. When you sleep, it files through info from the day and sorts valuable data into your memory. In fact, studies have shown that people are better at recalling something they’ve memorized after a nap than with no nap at all.

  • Question 1/10

    A child who has trouble falling asleep at night may need:

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    A child who has trouble falling asleep at night may need:

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    It’s a myth that kids who can’t quickly drift off at bedtime must be napping too much. In fact, the opposite is true. Children who are well-rested often find it easy to get to sleep. It’s when they’re “over-tired” that they’ll feel too hyped up and wired to finally rest at nighttime.

  • Question 1/10

    If you take a “coffee nap,” you’ll sip coffee before you rest so:

  • Answer 1/10

    If you take a “coffee nap,” you’ll sip coffee before you rest so:

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    A cup of coffee before you nap sounds like putting the cart before the horse, but caffeine takes a while to affect you. Do it this way, and you could wake up more alert than from the nap alone. That pre-nap shot of caffeine may also keep you from getting sleepy again after you wake.

  • Question 1/10

    To make sure you’re not groggy after a nap, it helps to:

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    To make sure you’re not groggy after a nap, it helps to:

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    Bright light signals your brain that naptime is over and it’s time to wake up! You can also take a short, brisk walk, splash cold water on your face, or just jump up and down a few times.

  • Question 1/10

    If you nap too much during the day, you could be more likely to have:

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    If you nap too much during the day, you could be more likely to have:

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    Long naps (40 minutes or more) every day can raise your chances of what’s known as metabolic syndrome. It’s a combo of health conditions that includes high blood pressure, high cholesterol, high blood sugar, and too much belly fat. All of these make heart disease more likely. The good news: Napping less than 30 minutes doesn’t raise, and may even lower, your risk of metabolic syndrome.

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    Your Score:

    You correctly answered out of questions.

    Results:

    You must be a true nap lover! Good job taking care of both your body and your mind.

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    Not bad! You clearly see the perks of daytime rest.

    Results:

    Hmm, you may want to get some shut-eye and learn more about naps.

Sources | Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario, MD on January 15, 2019 Medically Reviewed on January 15, 2019

Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario, MD on
January 15, 2019

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

1) Jupiterimages, Brand X Pictures / Thinkstock

 

SOURCES:

National Sleep Foundation: “Napping,” “Health Benefits of Napping,” “Catching Up on Sleep,” “What’s the Best Time of the Day to Nap?” “Debunking Sleep Myths: Does Napping During the Day Affect Your Sleep at Night?”

Harvard Medical School Division of Sleep Medicine: “Natural Patterns of Sleep.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Need a Nap? Here’s How Much Time is Best.”

KidsHealth.org: “Naps.”

Sleep Health Foundation: “Common Myths About Sleep.”

Clinical Neurophysiology: “The alerting effects of caffeine, bright light and face washing after a short daytime nap.”

Ergonomics: “The use of prophylactic naps and caffeine to maintain performance during a continuous operation.”

Harvard Health: “Napping Might Not Be Such a No-No.”

American College of Cardiology: “Long Naps, Daytime Sleepiness, Tied to Greater Risk of Metabolic Syndrome.”

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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