PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

How can you learn your smoking triggers?

ANSWER

Once you know yours, you can prepare to avoid or manage them.

Before you quit, keep a journal for a few days or a week. Use your smartphone or a small notebook that you can easily carry with you. Every time you light a cigarette, record:

  • The time of day
  • How intense your craving feels, on a scale of 1 to 5 (with 5 being the most intense)
  • What you’re doing at that moment
  • Where you are
  • Who you’re with
  • How you feel (happy, stressed, bored, etc.)

From: Find Your Smoking Triggers WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: 

Steven Schroeder, MD, director, Smoking Cessation Leadership Center, University of California, San Francisco.

Scott McIntosh, PhD, associate professor of community and preventive medicine, University of Rochester, New York; director, Greater Rochester Area Tobacco Cessation Center.

National Cancer Institute.

American Cancer Society: “Guide to Quitting Smoking.”

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

QuitNow Canada.

Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario on January 16, 2019

SOURCES: 

Steven Schroeder, MD, director, Smoking Cessation Leadership Center, University of California, San Francisco.

Scott McIntosh, PhD, associate professor of community and preventive medicine, University of Rochester, New York; director, Greater Rochester Area Tobacco Cessation Center.

National Cancer Institute.

American Cancer Society: “Guide to Quitting Smoking.”

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

QuitNow Canada.

Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario on January 16, 2019

NEXT QUESTION:

How can you squelch smoking triggers before they happen?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.