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Can exercise help prevent stroke?

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Yes! Being a couch potato can lead to obesity, high cholesterol, diabetes, and high blood pressure -- a recipe for stroke. So get moving. You don’t have to run a marathon. It’s enough to work out 30 minutes, 5 days a week. You should do enough to make you breathe hard, but not huff and puff. Talk to your doctor before you start exercising.

From: What Can Help Prevent a Stroke? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Stroke Association: “Impact of Stroke (Stroke Statistics),” “Hemorrhagic Strokes (Bleeds).” 

CDC: “Preventing Stroke: Healthy Living,” “About Stroke,” “Family History and Other Characteristics That Increase Risk for Stroke,” “Smoking and Heart Disease and Stroke,” “Behaviors That Increase Risk for Stroke,” “Preventing Stroke: What You Can Do.”

National Stroke Association: “High Blood Pressure and Stroke,” “Lifestyle Risk Factors,” “Diabetes and Stroke,” “Cholesterol and Stroke,” “Stroke and Sleep Disorders,” “Preventing Another Stroke.”

Harvard Medical School: “Stroke Risk When You Have Atrial Fibrillation,” “Why You Should Keep Tabs on Your Drinking.”

American Heart Association: “Treatment and Prevention of Atrial Fibrillation,” “What are the Symptoms of Atrial Fibrillation (AFib or AF)?”

Journal of the American Heart Association: “Alcohol Consumption, Left Atrial Diameter, and Atrial Fibrillation.”

Stroke Association (UK): “Exercise and Stroke.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Eating Well After a Stroke.”

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: “Aspirin to Prevent a First Heart Attack or Stroke,” “What Causes Atrial Fibrillation?”

Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health: “The Nutrition Source.”

Reviewed by James Beckerman on July 31, 2017

SOURCES:

American Stroke Association: “Impact of Stroke (Stroke Statistics),” “Hemorrhagic Strokes (Bleeds).” 

CDC: “Preventing Stroke: Healthy Living,” “About Stroke,” “Family History and Other Characteristics That Increase Risk for Stroke,” “Smoking and Heart Disease and Stroke,” “Behaviors That Increase Risk for Stroke,” “Preventing Stroke: What You Can Do.”

National Stroke Association: “High Blood Pressure and Stroke,” “Lifestyle Risk Factors,” “Diabetes and Stroke,” “Cholesterol and Stroke,” “Stroke and Sleep Disorders,” “Preventing Another Stroke.”

Harvard Medical School: “Stroke Risk When You Have Atrial Fibrillation,” “Why You Should Keep Tabs on Your Drinking.”

American Heart Association: “Treatment and Prevention of Atrial Fibrillation,” “What are the Symptoms of Atrial Fibrillation (AFib or AF)?”

Journal of the American Heart Association: “Alcohol Consumption, Left Atrial Diameter, and Atrial Fibrillation.”

Stroke Association (UK): “Exercise and Stroke.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Eating Well After a Stroke.”

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: “Aspirin to Prevent a First Heart Attack or Stroke,” “What Causes Atrial Fibrillation?”

Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health: “The Nutrition Source.”

Reviewed by James Beckerman on July 31, 2017

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Are there foods that can help prevent stroke?

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