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How are symptoms of vascular dementia different from Alzheimer's disease?

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Symptoms that suddenly get worse often signal a stroke. Doctors look for symptoms that progress in noticeable stages to diagnose vascular dementia. Alzheimer's, by comparison, progresses at a slow, steady pace. Another clue is impaired coordination or balance. In vascular dementia, problems walking or balancing can happen early. With Alzheimer's, these symptoms usually occur late in the disease.

From: Vascular Dementia WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Institute on Aging: "Forgetfulness: Knowing When to Ask for Help."

Mental Health America: "Factsheet: Multi-infarct Dementia."

Alzheimer's Association: "Vascular Dementia."

University of California, San Francisco, Memory and Aging Center: "Vascular Dementia."

Chapman, D.P. [serial online] April 2006. Preventing Chronic Disease,

National Institute on Aging: "Alzheimer's Disease Fact Sheet." 

Erkinjuntti, T. , 2004; vol 35: p 1010. Stroke

National Institutes of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "NINDS Multi-Infarct Dementia Information Page."

Reviewed by Suzanne R. Steinbaum on January 23, 2017

SOURCES:

National Institute on Aging: "Forgetfulness: Knowing When to Ask for Help."

Mental Health America: "Factsheet: Multi-infarct Dementia."

Alzheimer's Association: "Vascular Dementia."

University of California, San Francisco, Memory and Aging Center: "Vascular Dementia."

Chapman, D.P. [serial online] April 2006. Preventing Chronic Disease,

National Institute on Aging: "Alzheimer's Disease Fact Sheet." 

Erkinjuntti, T. , 2004; vol 35: p 1010. Stroke

National Institutes of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "NINDS Multi-Infarct Dementia Information Page."

Reviewed by Suzanne R. Steinbaum on January 23, 2017

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What is the treatment for vascular dementia?

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