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What is a transient ischemic attack (TIA)?

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From head to toe, your blood delivers oxygen to every part of your body. Your cells need it to survive. If your blood flow gets blocked anywhere, it can bring big trouble. One serious effect is a problem called a transient ischemic attack, or TIA for short.

When you have a TIA, the flow of blood to part of your brain gets cut off for a short time. It's also called a ministroke, but don't let the "mini" part fool you. A TIA can be a sign that a full-blown stroke is on the way.

From: What Is a TIA? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: "Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA)."

American Heart Association/American Stroke Association: "Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA)," "Stroke Risks."

NHS: "Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA)."

Cleveland Clinic: "Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA)."

National Stroke Association: "What Is TIA?" "Women and Stroke."

Reviewed by James Beckerman on July 12, 2017

SOURCES:

Mayo Clinic: "Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA)."

American Heart Association/American Stroke Association: "Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA)," "Stroke Risks."

NHS: "Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA)."

Cleveland Clinic: "Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA)."

National Stroke Association: "What Is TIA?" "Women and Stroke."

Reviewed by James Beckerman on July 12, 2017

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What is a transient ischemic attack (TIA)?

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