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Does an overactive bladder in children go away on its own?

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In most cases, children outgrow the problem of an overactive bladder. For each year after the age of 5, the number of overactive bladder cases declines by 15%. The child may learn to respond in a more timely manner to the body's signals to urinate or bladder capacity may increase over time. In addition, overactive bladders can "settle down," often when stressful events or experiences have ended.

From: Overactive Bladder in Children WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Medline Plus: "Oxybutynin."

About.com: Pediatrics: "Urinary Tract Infection Symptoms."

Pediatrics: "Pollakiuria, Extraordinary Daytime Urinary Frequency: Experience in a Pediatric Practice."

NIDDK: "Urinary Incontinence in Children."

Medline Plus: "Urinary Incontinence."

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on July 27, 2017

SOURCES:

Medline Plus: "Oxybutynin."

About.com: Pediatrics: "Urinary Tract Infection Symptoms."

Pediatrics: "Pollakiuria, Extraordinary Daytime Urinary Frequency: Experience in a Pediatric Practice."

NIDDK: "Urinary Incontinence in Children."

Medline Plus: "Urinary Incontinence."

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on July 27, 2017

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How is an overactive bladder treated in children?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

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