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How can devices and absorbent products help with urinary incontinence?

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Protective pads and panty liners can help avoid embarrassing situations when you don’t have control over your bladder. A pessary, a plastic device inserted into the vagina, may help pee from leaking by supporting the neck of the bladder. It’s most useful for stress incontinence, when your bladder leaks when you cough, laugh, or sneeze.

From: Treatment for Urinary Incontinence WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: 

American Academy of Family Physicians: "Urinary Incontinence: Embarrassing but Treatable." 

Jennifer Anger, MD, MPH, urologist, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles. 

Amy Rosenman, MD, co-author, , urogynecologist, Santa Monica, CA, associate clinical professor, UCLA.  The Incontinence Solution

National Library of Medicine MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia: "Urge Incontinence." 

Halina Zynczynski, MD, director, division of Urogynecology and Reconstructive Pelvic Surgery, Magee-Women's Hospital, associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA. 

American Family Physician: "Selecting Medications for the Treatment of Urinary Incontinence." 

National Association for Continence: "Treatment Options for Incontinence." 

American Urological Association: "Diagnosis and Treatment of Overactive Bladder (Non-Neurogenic) in Adults: AUA/SUFU Guideline."

Global Library of Women's Medicine. 

Rovner, E. ., 2004;  Rev Urol

Reviewed by Debra Jaliman on November 18, 2017

SOURCES: 

American Academy of Family Physicians: "Urinary Incontinence: Embarrassing but Treatable." 

Jennifer Anger, MD, MPH, urologist, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles. 

Amy Rosenman, MD, co-author, , urogynecologist, Santa Monica, CA, associate clinical professor, UCLA.  The Incontinence Solution

National Library of Medicine MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia: "Urge Incontinence." 

Halina Zynczynski, MD, director, division of Urogynecology and Reconstructive Pelvic Surgery, Magee-Women's Hospital, associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA. 

American Family Physician: "Selecting Medications for the Treatment of Urinary Incontinence." 

National Association for Continence: "Treatment Options for Incontinence." 

American Urological Association: "Diagnosis and Treatment of Overactive Bladder (Non-Neurogenic) in Adults: AUA/SUFU Guideline."

Global Library of Women's Medicine. 

Rovner, E. ., 2004;  Rev Urol

Reviewed by Debra Jaliman on November 18, 2017

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