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What are the most common bladder issues women face during and after menopause?

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The most common bladder issues women face during and after menopause are:

  • Stress incontinence. You might lose a few drops of urine when you’re coughing, sneezing, or laughing. Or you might notice leaking when you’re lifting something heavy or doing something that puts pressure on your bladder.
  • Urge incontinence. The need to pee comes on fast and unexpectedly. You might not make it to a bathroom in time. This is sometimes called an “irritable” or “overactive” bladder.
  • Nocturia. Some women wake up several times in the middle of the night with an urge to pee.
  • Painful urination. After menopause, women are more likely to have urinary tract infections (UTIs). They can give you a burning sensation while peeing.

SOURCES:

Bladder and Bowel Foundation: “After the Menopause.”

Harvard Medical School: “Dealing With the Symptoms of Menopause.”

Office on Women’s Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: “Urinary Incontinence Fact Sheet.”

Hormone Health Network: “What Is Estrogen?” “Menopause Map: Perimenopause”

The North American Menopause Society: “Changes in the Vagina and Vulva.”

Northwest Women’s Center: “Patient Information: Stress Incontinence.”

University of Colorado Urogynecology: “Menopause & Urinary Symptoms.”

National Institute on Aging: “Urinary Incontinence.”

University of California San Francisco Medical Center: “Urge Incontinence in Women Treatment,” “Stress Incontinence in Women Treatment,” “Pessaries.”

Henry Ford Health System: “Women’s Health: Pelvic Floor Disorder Symptoms and Diagnosis.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Overactive Bladder,” “Are Your Medications Causing or Increasing Incontinence?”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “What I Need to Know About Bladder Control for Women,” “Urodynamic Testing,” “Nerve Disease and Bladder Control,” Medicines for Bladder Control.”

Lee, J. . Nursing Times

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on April 11, 2017

SOURCES:

Bladder and Bowel Foundation: “After the Menopause.”

Harvard Medical School: “Dealing With the Symptoms of Menopause.”

Office on Women’s Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: “Urinary Incontinence Fact Sheet.”

Hormone Health Network: “What Is Estrogen?” “Menopause Map: Perimenopause”

The North American Menopause Society: “Changes in the Vagina and Vulva.”

Northwest Women’s Center: “Patient Information: Stress Incontinence.”

University of Colorado Urogynecology: “Menopause & Urinary Symptoms.”

National Institute on Aging: “Urinary Incontinence.”

University of California San Francisco Medical Center: “Urge Incontinence in Women Treatment,” “Stress Incontinence in Women Treatment,” “Pessaries.”

Henry Ford Health System: “Women’s Health: Pelvic Floor Disorder Symptoms and Diagnosis.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Overactive Bladder,” “Are Your Medications Causing or Increasing Incontinence?”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “What I Need to Know About Bladder Control for Women,” “Urodynamic Testing,” “Nerve Disease and Bladder Control,” Medicines for Bladder Control.”

Lee, J. . Nursing Times

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on April 11, 2017

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What tests might your doctor want to use when checking for bladder issues?

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