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What are third-line treatments for interstitial cystitis?

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If second-line treatments don’t work, your doctor will likely turn to the third-line treatments. They require cystoscopy, a special scope used to look at the bladder, often in an operating room under anesthesia. Treatments may include:

  • Bladder stretching. Slowly stretching the bladder wall with fluid may help relieve symptoms. If it’s helpful, the effect usually lasts less than six months. Repeat treatment may help.
  • Steroids. If you have ulcers called Hunner’s lesions on your bladder, a doctor may remove them, burn them, or inject them with steroids.
  • Dimethyl sulfoxide. For people who haven’t found relief through other drugs, this drug is placed in the bladder with a catheter. It’s believed to work by fighting inflammation and blocking pain. Doctors don’t often recommend it because it may temporarily worsen symptoms and takes multiple doctor visits.

From: Interstitial Cystitis WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome.”

Urology Care Foundation: “Symptoms,” Treatment,” “After Initial Treatment.”

Harvard Medical School: “Diagnosing and Treating Interstitial Cystitis.”

Interstitial Cystitis Association: “4 to 12 Million May Have IC.”

Office on Women’s Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: “Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome fact sheet.”

UpToDate: “Management of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome.”

Reviewed by Michael W. Smith on October 23, 2017

SOURCES:

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome.”

Urology Care Foundation: “Symptoms,” Treatment,” “After Initial Treatment.”

Harvard Medical School: “Diagnosing and Treating Interstitial Cystitis.”

Interstitial Cystitis Association: “4 to 12 Million May Have IC.”

Office on Women’s Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: “Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome fact sheet.”

UpToDate: “Management of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome.”

Reviewed by Michael W. Smith on October 23, 2017

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What are fourth-line treatments for interstitial cystitis?

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