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What behavioral therapies do doctors use to treat frequent urination?

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The treatment for frequent urination should begin with behavioral therapies, such as:

  • Bladder retraining. This involves increasing the intervals between using the bathroom over the course of about 12 weeks. This helps retrain your bladder to hold urine longer and to urinate less frequently.
  • Diet modification. You should avoid any food that appears to irritate your bladder or acts as a diuretic. These may include caffeine, alcohol, carbonated drinks, tomato-based products, chocolate, artificial sweeteners, and spicy foods. It's also important to eat high-fiber foods, because constipation may worsen the symptoms of overactive bladder syndrome.
  • Monitoring fluid intake. You should drink enough to prevent constipation and over-concentration of urine, but you should avoid drinking just before bedtime, which can lead to nighttime urination.
  • Kegel exercises. These exercises help strengthen the muscles around the bladder and urethra to improve bladder control and reduce urinary urgency and frequency. Exercising pelvic muscles for five minutes three times a day can make a difference in bladder control.
  • Biofeedback. This techinique can help you learn how your pelvic muscles work to help you better control them.  

SOURCES:

International Painful Bladder Foundation: "The Urinary Tract and How It Works."

MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia: "Frequent or Urgent Urination."

American Diabetes Association: "Dropping Insulin to Drop Pounds."

March of Dimes: "Changes During Pregnancy"

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: "Prostate Enlargement: Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia."

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: "Interstitial Cystitis/ Painful Bladder Syndrome."

University of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics Authority: "After a Stroke, Managing Your Bladder."

MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia: "Frequent or Urgent Urination."

MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia: "Urinalysis."

MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia: "Cystometry."

WebMD Information and Resources: "Cystoscopy."

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "Neurological Diagnostic Tests and Procedures."

The American Heritage Medical Dictionary, Houghton Mifflin Company, 2007.

National Center of Biotechnology Information: "Comparing Drugs for Overactive Bladder Syndrome."

National Association for Continence: "Overactive Bladder Syndrome."

News release, FDA.

American Urological Association: "Diagnosis and Treatment of Overactive Bladder (Non-Neurogenic) in Adults: AUA/SUFU Guideline."

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on January 17, 2017

SOURCES:

International Painful Bladder Foundation: "The Urinary Tract and How It Works."

MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia: "Frequent or Urgent Urination."

American Diabetes Association: "Dropping Insulin to Drop Pounds."

March of Dimes: "Changes During Pregnancy"

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: "Prostate Enlargement: Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia."

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: "Interstitial Cystitis/ Painful Bladder Syndrome."

University of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics Authority: "After a Stroke, Managing Your Bladder."

MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia: "Frequent or Urgent Urination."

MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia: "Urinalysis."

MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia: "Cystometry."

WebMD Information and Resources: "Cystoscopy."

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "Neurological Diagnostic Tests and Procedures."

The American Heritage Medical Dictionary, Houghton Mifflin Company, 2007.

National Center of Biotechnology Information: "Comparing Drugs for Overactive Bladder Syndrome."

National Association for Continence: "Overactive Bladder Syndrome."

News release, FDA.

American Urological Association: "Diagnosis and Treatment of Overactive Bladder (Non-Neurogenic) in Adults: AUA/SUFU Guideline."

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on January 17, 2017

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What drugs are used to treat frequent urination?

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