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What can you do to help bladder issues from menopause?

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Depending on your type of incontinence, small changes may help you regain control of your bladder.

  • Tighten your pelvic floor. Kegel exercises involve repeatedly tightening and releasing your pelvic floor muscles for a few seconds, as if you were cutting off your pee. Aim to do three sets of 10 Kegels each day.
  • Limit, coffee, tea, soda, and alcoholic drinks.
  • Limit all liquids later in the day.
  • Keep a healthy weight. Extra pounds put more pressure on your bladder.
  • Time your bathroom trips. If you make bathroom breaks on a set schedule -- for instance, every hour -- it can help you regain control of your bladder muscles.

SOURCES:

Bladder and Bowel Foundation: “After the Menopause.”

Harvard Medical School: “Dealing With the Symptoms of Menopause.”

Office on Women’s Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: “Urinary Incontinence Fact Sheet.”

Hormone Health Network: “What Is Estrogen?” “Menopause Map: Perimenopause”

The North American Menopause Society: “Changes in the Vagina and Vulva.”

Northwest Women’s Center: “Patient Information: Stress Incontinence.”

University of Colorado Urogynecology: “Menopause & Urinary Symptoms.”

National Institute on Aging: “Urinary Incontinence.”

University of California San Francisco Medical Center: “Urge Incontinence in Women Treatment,” “Stress Incontinence in Women Treatment,” “Pessaries.”

Henry Ford Health System: “Women’s Health: Pelvic Floor Disorder Symptoms and Diagnosis.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Overactive Bladder,” “Are Your Medications Causing or Increasing Incontinence?”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “What I Need to Know About Bladder Control for Women,” “Urodynamic Testing,” “Nerve Disease and Bladder Control,” Medicines for Bladder Control.”

Lee, J. . Nursing Times

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on April 11, 2017

SOURCES:

Bladder and Bowel Foundation: “After the Menopause.”

Harvard Medical School: “Dealing With the Symptoms of Menopause.”

Office on Women’s Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: “Urinary Incontinence Fact Sheet.”

Hormone Health Network: “What Is Estrogen?” “Menopause Map: Perimenopause”

The North American Menopause Society: “Changes in the Vagina and Vulva.”

Northwest Women’s Center: “Patient Information: Stress Incontinence.”

University of Colorado Urogynecology: “Menopause & Urinary Symptoms.”

National Institute on Aging: “Urinary Incontinence.”

University of California San Francisco Medical Center: “Urge Incontinence in Women Treatment,” “Stress Incontinence in Women Treatment,” “Pessaries.”

Henry Ford Health System: “Women’s Health: Pelvic Floor Disorder Symptoms and Diagnosis.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Overactive Bladder,” “Are Your Medications Causing or Increasing Incontinence?”

National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: “What I Need to Know About Bladder Control for Women,” “Urodynamic Testing,” “Nerve Disease and Bladder Control,” Medicines for Bladder Control.”

Lee, J. . Nursing Times

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on April 11, 2017

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How are bladder control issues from menopause treated?

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