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What foods should you cut back on to reduce urge incontinence symptoms?

ANSWER

In addition to cutting down or eliminating alcohol and caffeine drinks, limiting other foods or beverages may help OAB. Try cutting back on:

Though urge incontinence is uncomfortable, it's also very treatable. Changes in your lifestyle and habits can play a part in treating it.

  • Acidic foods and beverages, such as tomatoes, pineapple, and citrus fruits such as oranges, grapefruit, lemons, and limes
  • Salty foods, which can make you thirstier and hence, lead to drinking more liquids
  • Spicy foods, such as chilies, which can irritate the bladder
  • Carbonated beverages, such as sodas or seltzers

SOURCES:

National Kidney and Urologic Information Clearinghouse: “Urinary Incontinence in Women” and “Kegel Exercise Tips.”

Kids Health: “Caffeine.”

National Toxicology Program: "Caffeine."

Kevin Stepp, MD, director of urogynecology and minimally invasive gynecology surgery, Carolinas Healthcare System, Charlotte, NC.

Johns Hopkins Health Alerts: “The Best Ways to Treat Overactive Bladder.”

Urology Health: “Adult Conditions: Overactive Bladder.”

Gregory A. Kitagawa, assistant professor, department of reproductive biology, Case Western Reserve University; ob-gyn, MetroHealth Medical Center; Cleveland.

National Association for Incontinence: “Diet and Daily Habits: Can This Affect Your Bladder or Bowel Control?”

University of Alabama Birmingham Medicine: “What Foods Make You Have to ‘Go?’”

Reviewed by William Blahd on July 12, 2017

SOURCES:

National Kidney and Urologic Information Clearinghouse: “Urinary Incontinence in Women” and “Kegel Exercise Tips.”

Kids Health: “Caffeine.”

National Toxicology Program: "Caffeine."

Kevin Stepp, MD, director of urogynecology and minimally invasive gynecology surgery, Carolinas Healthcare System, Charlotte, NC.

Johns Hopkins Health Alerts: “The Best Ways to Treat Overactive Bladder.”

Urology Health: “Adult Conditions: Overactive Bladder.”

Gregory A. Kitagawa, assistant professor, department of reproductive biology, Case Western Reserve University; ob-gyn, MetroHealth Medical Center; Cleveland.

National Association for Incontinence: “Diet and Daily Habits: Can This Affect Your Bladder or Bowel Control?”

University of Alabama Birmingham Medicine: “What Foods Make You Have to ‘Go?’”

Reviewed by William Blahd on July 12, 2017

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Could what I'm drinking cause me to pee so much at night?

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