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What is traditional sling surgery?

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It's one of the two types of sling surgery. It's more involved than mid-urethral surgery. Your surgeon will take a strip of tissue from your stomach or thigh to make the sling, or they might use tissue from a donor. Then they’ll make two cuts, one in your vagina and one in your belly. They’ll stretch the sling through the cut in your stomach, then stitch it to the inside of your stomach wall.

Men also can have sling surgery. The surgeon will make a small cut between the scrotum and anus and put the sling around part of the urethral bulb (the enlarged end of the urethra in men). This will squeeze and lift the urethra, which helps prevent leaks.

From: What Is Sling Surgery? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: Urology Care Foundation: “Stress Urinary Incontinence: A Patient Guide,” “Facts About Surgical Mesh to Treat Stress Urinary Incontinence.”

Mayo Clinic: “Stress Incontinence,” “Urinary Incontinence Surgery in Women: The Next Step.”

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: “Surgery for Stress Incontinence.”

American Urogynecologic Society: “Frequently Asked Questions by Patients Mid-urethral Slings for Stress Urinary Incontinence.”

FDA: “Considerations about Surgical Mesh for SUI.”  

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on February 12, 2018

SOURCES: Urology Care Foundation: “Stress Urinary Incontinence: A Patient Guide,” “Facts About Surgical Mesh to Treat Stress Urinary Incontinence.”

Mayo Clinic: “Stress Incontinence,” “Urinary Incontinence Surgery in Women: The Next Step.”

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: “Surgery for Stress Incontinence.”

American Urogynecologic Society: “Frequently Asked Questions by Patients Mid-urethral Slings for Stress Urinary Incontinence.”

FDA: “Considerations about Surgical Mesh for SUI.”  

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on February 12, 2018

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