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What other methods can be used to treat bedwetting related to an overactive bladder in children?

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In the vast majority of children, bedwetting improves on its own over time, so treatment is not needed. If bedwetting is a significant problem for a child, several treatments are available.

One treatment for bedwetting is a moisture alarm. This device includes a water-sensitive pad with a wire connected to a control unit. When moisture is detected, an alarm sounds, waking the child. In some cases, another person may need to be in the room to waken the child if he or she does not do so on his or her own.

Another option for treating bedwetting is medication. Increasing levels of antidiuretic hormone (ADH) might help treat nighttime incontinence. Desmopressin, or DDAVP, is a synthetic version of antidiuretic hormone (ADH). This drug, which is approved for use in children, comes in pills, nose drops, or nasal spray.

In addition, the drug imipramine can be used. This medication affects the brain as well as the bladder. According to researchers, an estimated 70% of kids who wet the bed may be helped by the use of these drugs.

From: Overactive Bladder in Children WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Medline Plus: "Oxybutynin."

About.com: Pediatrics: "Urinary Tract Infection Symptoms."

Pediatrics: "Pollakiuria, Extraordinary Daytime Urinary Frequency: Experience in a Pediatric Practice."

NIDDK: "Urinary Incontinence in Children."

Medline Plus: "Urinary Incontinence."

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on July 27, 2017

SOURCES:

Medline Plus: "Oxybutynin."

About.com: Pediatrics: "Urinary Tract Infection Symptoms."

Pediatrics: "Pollakiuria, Extraordinary Daytime Urinary Frequency: Experience in a Pediatric Practice."

NIDDK: "Urinary Incontinence in Children."

Medline Plus: "Urinary Incontinence."

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on July 27, 2017

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